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See also: Hire and híre

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hire, hyre, here, hure, from Old English hȳr (employment for wages; pay for service; interest on money lent), from Proto-Germanic *hūrijō (hire), of uncertain origin. Compare Proto-Indo-European *kūs- (price; hire).

Cognate with West Frisian hier (hire), Dutch huur (hire), Low German Hüre (hire), German Heuer (hire), Danish hyre (hire).

The verb is from Middle English hiren, heren, huren, from Old English hȳrian.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hire (plural hires)

  1. Payment for the temporary use of something.
    The sign offered pedalos on hire.
  2. (obsolete) Reward, payment.
    • Bible, Luke x. 7
      The labourer is worthy of his hire.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.viii:
      I will him reaue of armes, the victors hire, / And of that shield, more worthy of good knight; / For why should a dead dog be deckt in armour bright?
  3. The state of being hired, or having a job; employment.
    When my grandfather retired, he had over twenty mechanics in his hire.
  4. A person who has been hired, especially in a cohort.
    We pair up each of our new hires with one of our original hires.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

hire (third-person singular simple present hires, present participle hiring, simple past and past participle hired)

  1. (transitive) To obtain the services of in return for fixed payment.
    We hired a car for two weeks because ours had broken down.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 16, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “[…] She takes the whole thing with desperate seriousness. But the others are all easy and jovial—thinking about the good fare that is soon to be eaten, about the hired fly, about anything.”
  2. (transitive) To employ; to obtain the services of (a person) in exchange for remuneration; to give someone a job.
    The company had problems when it tried to hire more skilled workers.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 10, in The Celebrity:
      The skipper Mr. Cooke had hired at Far Harbor was a God-fearing man with a luke warm interest in his new billet and employer, and had only been prevailed upon to take charge of the yacht after the offer of an emolument equal to half a year's sea pay of an ensign in the navy.
  3. (transitive) To exchange the services of for remuneration.
    They hired themselves out as day laborers.  They hired out their basement for Inauguration week.
  4. (transitive) To accomplish by paying for services.
    After waiting two years for her husband to finish the tiling, she decided to hire it done.
  5. (intransitive) To accept employment.
    They hired out as day laborers.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AbronEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Akan hyire (white clay).

NounEdit

hire

  1. white clay

ReferencesEdit

  • Trutenau, Languages of the Akan Area: Papers in Western Kwa Linguistics (1976)

BasqueEdit

PronounEdit

hire

  1. yours

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

hire

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ひれ

Middle DutchEdit

ContractionEdit

hire

  1. Contraction of hi dāer.

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English hiere (her), from Proto-Germanic *hezōi, dative singular plural of *hiz (this), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe (here; this).

Alternative formsEdit

DeterminerEdit

hire (nominative pronoun sche)

  1. Third-person singular feminine genitive determiner: her, of her.
  2. Used in place of the possessive suffix -es to denote possession by an antecedent noun.
    • 1430, Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, "The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale.
      Here begynnyt the wyf of bathe hir tale.
SynonymsEdit
DescendantsEdit

PronounEdit

hire (nominative sche)

  1. Third-person singular feminine genitive pronoun: hers.
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English hire.

PronounEdit

hire (nominative sche)

  1. Third-person singular feminine pronoun indicating a grammatical object: her.
  2. (reflexive) herself.
  3. Third-person singular neuter pronoun indicating a grammatical object: it.
See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English here.

NounEdit

hire

  1. Alternative form of here (army)

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

hire

  1. Genitive of hēo
  2. Dative of hēo