EnglishEdit

 Pawn on Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
A black pawn in chess

From Middle English pown, pawn, from Anglo-Norman paun, poun (pawn, pedestrian) ( = Old French poon, päon, pëon), from Late Latin pedō, pedōnis (footsoldier), from Latin pēs, pēd- (foot). Doublet of peon.

NounEdit

pawn (plural pawns)

  1. (chess) The most common chess piece, or a similar piece in a similar game. In chess each side has eight; moves are only forward, and attacks are only forward diagonally or en passant.
  2. (figuratively) Someone who is being manipulated or used to some end.
    Though a pawn of the gods, her departure is the precipitating cause of the Trojan War.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Chess pieces in English · chess pieces, chessmen (see also: chess) (layout · text)
           
king queen castle, rook bishop knight pawn

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French pan (pledge, security), apparently from a Germanic language (compare Middle Dutch pant, Old High German pfant).

NounEdit

pawn (countable and uncountable, plural pawns)

  1. (uncountable) The state of being held as security for a loan, or as a pledge.
    All our jewellery was in pawn by this stage.
  2. An instance of pawning something.
  3. (now rare) An item given as security on a loan, or as a pledge.
  4. (rare) A pawnshop; pawnbroker.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pawn (third-person singular simple present pawns, present participle pawning, simple past and past participle pawned)

  1. To pledge; to stake or wager.
  2. To give as security on a loan of money; especially, to deposit (something) at a pawn shop.
    • 1904, Henry Warren, The Customer's Guide to Banking (page 7)
      A certain, and probably an appreciable, proportion of his so-called money at call and short notice would consist of fortnightly advances made to members of the Stock Exchange against pawned stocks and shares.
    • 1965, Bob Dylan, Like a Rolling Stone
      But you'd better take your diamond ring, you'd better pawn it, babe.
SynonymsEdit
  • (to deposit at a pawn shop): hock
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

pawn (countable and uncountable, plural pawns)

  1. Alternative form of paan
    • 1832, Meer Hassan Ali, Observations on the Mussulmauns of India:
      A tray filled with pawns, prepared with the usual ingredients, as lime cuttie (a bitter gum), betel-nut, tobacco, spices, &c.
    • 1892, Chambers's Journal (volume 69, page 320)
      To our English taste, pawn is very offensive; but the natives of India relish it, and regard it as a necessity. It is much eaten by Mohammedans of both sexes, and by the natives of Bengal.

Etymology 4Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

pawn (plural pawns)

  1. A gallery.

Etymology 5Edit

VerbEdit

pawn (third-person singular simple present pawns, present participle pawning, simple past and past participle pawned)

  1. (video games) Alternative form of pwn

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

pawn

  1. Alternative form of pown (pawn)