exception

See also: Exception

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English exception, excepcioun, from Anglo-Norman excepcioun, from Old French excepcion, from Latin exceptiō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /əkˈsɛpʃən/, IPA(key): /ɪkˈsɛpʃən/
  • (file)

NounEdit

exception (countable and uncountable, plural exceptions)

  1. The act of excepting or excluding; exclusion; restriction by taking out something which would otherwise be included, as in a class, statement, rule.
    the exception of a rule
  2. That which is excluded from others; a person, thing, or case, specified as distinct, or not included.
    • 2012, Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow, →ISBN, page 31:
      The Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution had abolished slavery but allowed one major exception: slavery remained appropriate as punishment for a crime.
    That rule is usually true, but there are a few exceptions.
  3. (law) An objection, on legal grounds; also, as in conveyancing, a clause by which the grantor excepts or reserves something before the right is transferred.
  4. An objection; cavil; dissent; disapprobation; offense; cause of offense; — usually followed by to or against.
  5. (computing) An interruption in normal processing, typically caused by an error condition, that can be handled by another part of the program.

SynonymsEdit

outlier

AntonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin exceptiō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

exception f (plural exceptions)

  1. exception
    Antonym: règle

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

exception f (plural exceptions)

  1. (computing) exception (an interruption in normal processing)
    Synonym: exceção