See also: Fro, FRO, fró, frø, frö, and 'fro

TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

fro

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Old French.

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English fro, fra, from Old English fra (from), from Old Norse frá (from), from Proto-Germanic *fram (from), from Proto-Indo-European *promo- (forth, forward). Cognate with Scots frae (fro, from), Icelandic frá (from). More at from.

AdverbEdit

fro (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) From; away; back or backward.
Usage notesEdit

In modern English, used only in the set phrase to and fro (back and forth).[1]

Derived termsEdit

PrepositionEdit

fro

  1. (obsolete) From.
    • c. 1503–1512, John Skelton, Ware the Hauke; republished in John Scattergood, editor, John Skelton: The Complete English Poems, 1983, OCLC 8728872, lines 15–16, page 62:
      The preest that hawkys so,
      All grace is far hym fro.

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of afro.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

fro (plural fros)

  1. (slang) Clipping of afro (hairstyle).

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Arika Okrent (2019-07-05), “12 Old Words That Survived by Getting Fossilized in Idioms”, in Mental Floss[1], Pocket, retrieved 2021-10-08

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /froːˀ/, [ˈfʁ̥oˀ]

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German vrō (happy), from Proto-Germanic *frawaz (energetic), cognate with German froh, Old Norse frár (swift).

AdjectiveEdit

fro

  1. happy, carefree
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German vrō (early, adverb), from Proto-Germanic *frōwaz (early), cognate with German früh, Dutch vroeg.

AdverbEdit

fro

  1. (obsolete) early
    Synonyms: tidligt, årle
    • 1747, Speculum vitæ aulicæ, eller den fordanskede Reynike Fosz, p.234
      Heel tilig meget froe, der Solen knap var oppe.
      Quite early, very early when the sun was barely on the heaven.
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

VerbEdit

fro

  1. second-person singular imperative of froen

Middle EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

fro

  1. from

NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French froc (frock, a monk's gown or habit), from Frankish *hrokk (robe, tunic), from Proto-Germanic *hrukkaz (robe, garment, cowl), variant of *rukkaz (upper garment, smock, shirt), from Proto-Indo-European *rug(')- (upper clothes, shirt).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
    (Jersey)

NounEdit

fro m (plural frocs)

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) dress

SynonymsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *frau, from Proto-Germanic *frawaz, whence also Old Norse frár (swift).

AdjectiveEdit

frō (inflected frawes)

  1. glad

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle High German: vrō

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *frawaz, whence also Old Norse frár (swift).

AdjectiveEdit

frō (comparative frōworo, superlative frōwost)

  1. glad

DeclensionEdit



WelshEdit

NounEdit

fro

  1. Soft mutation of bro.

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /vroː/

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bro fro mro unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.