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See also: Glad, gläd, and glað

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English glad, gled, from Old English glæd (shining; bright; cheerful; glad), from Proto-Germanic *gladaz (shiny; gleaming; radiant; happy; glossy; smooth; flat), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰladʰ-, from *gʰel- (to shine).

Cognate with Scots gled, glaid (shining; bright; glad), Saterland Frisian glääd (smooth; sleek), West Frisian glêd (smooth), Dutch glad (smooth; sleek; slippery), German glatt (smooth; sleek; slippery), Danish, Norwegian and Swedish glad (glad; happy; cheerful), Icelandic glaður (glad; joyful; cheery), Latin glaber (smooth; hairless; bald).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

glad (comparative gladder or more glad, superlative gladdest or most glad)

  1. Pleased, happy, gratified.
    I'm glad the rain has finally stopped.
    • Bible, Proverbs x.1:
      A wise son maketh a glad father.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      Glad am I that your highness is so armed.
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall, The Squire's Daughter, chapterII:
      "I was dragged up at the workhouse school till I was twelve. Then I ran away and sold papers in the streets, and anything else that I could pick up a few coppers by—except steal. I never did that. I always made up my mind I'd be a big man some day, and—I'm glad I didn't steal."
  2. (obsolete) Having a bright or cheerful appearance; expressing or exciting joy; producing gladness.
    • Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586)
      Her conversation / More glad to me than to a miser money is.
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      Glad evening and glad morn crowned the fourth day.

Usage notesEdit

The comparative "gladder" and superlative "gladdest" are not incorrect but may be unfamiliar enough to be taken as such. In both American and British English, the forms "more" and "most glad" are equally common in print and more common in daily speech.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

glad (third-person singular simple present glads, present participle gladding, simple past and past participle gladded)

  1. (archaic, transitive) To make glad
    Synonyms: cheer up, gladden, exhilarate
    • Dryden
      that which gladded all the warrior train
    • Alexander Pope
      Each drinks the juice that glads the heart of man.
    • 1922, A. E. Housman, Epithalamium, line 3
      God that glads the lover's heart

BretonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Breton gloat (kingdom, wealth), from Proto-Brythonic *gwlad, from Proto-Celtic *wlatis (sovereignty), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wélh₁tis ~ *h₂wl̥h₁téy-, from the root *h₂welh₁-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

glad f (plural gladoù)

  1. arable land
  2. patrimony, estate
  3. (archaic) territory, country
  4. (archaic) feudal domain

InflectionEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse glaðr.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡlad/, [ɡ̊lað]

AdjectiveEdit

glad (neuter glad, plural and definite singular attributive glade, comparative gladere, superlative (predicative) gladest, superlative (attributive) gladeste)

  1. happy, glad

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse glaðr

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

glad (neuter singular glad, definite singular and plural glade, comparative gladere, indefinite superlative gladest, definite superlative gladeste)

  1. happy, glad

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse glaðr. Akin to English glad.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

glad (neuter singular glad, definite singular and plural glade, comparative gladare, indefinite superlative gladast, definite superlative gladaste)

  1. happy, glad

ReferencesEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gladaz

AdjectiveEdit

glad

  1. glad

DeclensionEdit



Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *goldъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

glȃd f (Cyrillic spelling гла̑д)

  1. hunger

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish glaþer, from Old Norse glaðr, from Proto-Germanic *gladaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰladʰ-, derivation of Proto-Indo-European *gʰel- (to shine).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

glad (comparative gladare, superlative gladast)

  1. happy, glad

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of glad
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular glad gladare gladast
Neuter singular glatt gladare gladast
Plural glada gladare gladast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 glade gladare gladaste
All glada gladare gladaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.