See also: ORF

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English orf, from Old English orf (cattle, livestock), from Proto-West Germanic *arbī.

Akin to Old English ierfe (inheritance, livestock, cattle). More at erf.

NounEdit

orf (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Cattle.
ReferencesEdit
  • orf in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Etymology 2Edit

From the same source as Etymology 1, or from Old Norse hrufa (scab), from Proto-Germanic *hreubaz (whence also dandruff).

NounEdit

orf (uncountable)

  1. (medicine) An exanthemous disease caused by a parapox virus, occurring primarily in sheep and goats but also capable of infecting humans.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See orfe.

NounEdit

orf (plural orfs)

  1. Alternative form of orfe (the fish)

Etymology 4Edit

Pronunciation spelling.

AdverbEdit

orf (not comparable)

  1. (pronunciation spelling) off
    • 1945, Enid Blyton, The Mystery of the Secret Room
      'Yes – you clear orf!' said Mr Goon majestically, feeling that he really had got the better of those interfering kids this time.

AdjectiveEdit

orf

  1. (pronunciation spelling) off

PrepositionEdit

orf

  1. (pronunciation spelling) off

AnagramsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse orv, from Proto-Germanic *wurƀa-, related to *warpą.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

orf n (genitive singular orfs, nominative plural orf)

  1. snath
  2. string trimmer

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Liberman, A. (1982). Germanic Accentology. United States: University of Minnesota Press, p. 165

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English orf, from Proto-West Germanic *arbī.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

orf (plural orffes)

  1. Stock, cattle; farm animals.
  2. A group of ovines in particular.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: orf

ReferencesEdit