English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From ab- +‎ normal. First attested in 1835, replacing the earlier anormal and even earlier abnormous,[1] from Latin abnormis (departing from normal), from either (ab- (away from) + norma (rule, norm)),[2] or Ancient Greek ἀνώμαλος (anṓmalos).[3]

Pronunciation

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  • Audio (US):(file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈæbˌnɔɹ.ml̩/, /əbˈnɔɹ.ml̩/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)məl

Adjective

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abnormal (comparative more abnormal, superlative most abnormal)

  1. Not conforming to rule or system; deviating from the usual or normal type. [First attested around the mid 19th century.][4]
    • 1899, Arthur Conan Doyle, chapter 6, in A Duet:
      And then after an abnormal meal, which was either a very late breakfast or a very early lunch, they drove on to Victoria Station.
  2. Of or pertaining to that which is irregular, in particular, behaviour that deviates from norms of social propriety or accepted standards of mental health. [First attested around the early 20th century.][4]
    • 1904, Jack London, chapter 23, in The Sea-Wolf (Macmillan’s Standard Library), New York, N.Y.: Grosset & Dunlap, →OCLC:
      Furuseth was right; I was abnormal, an "emotionless monster," a strange bookish creature, capable of pleasuring in sensations only of the mind.
    • 1936, Rollo Ahmed, The Black Art, London: Long, page 161:
      Many of the so-called rites of these secret societies were so patently ridiculous, that it is quite obvious that they were merely an excuse for men and women to indulge in sex-play and lustful gratification, frequently of an abnormal kind.

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Cebuano: abnormal
  • Norwegian Bokmål: abnormal
  • Tagalog: abnormal

Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun

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abnormal (plural abnormals)

  1. A person or object that is not normal.

References

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  1. ^ Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], →ISBN), page 3
  2. ^ Morris, William, editor (1969), The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, New York, NY: American Heritage Publishing Co., Inc., published 1971, →ISBN, page 3
  3. ^ Christine A. Lindberg, editor (2002), “abnormal”, in The Oxford College Dictionary, 2nd edition, New York, N.Y.: Spark Publishing, →ISBN, page 3.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief, William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors (2002), “abnormal”, in The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford, New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 6.

Cebuano

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English abnormal.

Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: ab‧nor‧mal

Adjective

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abnormal

  1. abnormal; deviating from the usual or normal type
  2. retarded (having mental retardation)
  3. stupid (lacking in intelligence)

Noun

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abnormal

  1. retard
  2. stupid person

Quotations

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For quotations using this term, see Citations:abnormal.

Derived terms

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German

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Etymology

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Related to Latin ab- and normal

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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abnormal (strong nominative masculine singular abnormaler, comparative abnormaler, superlative am abnormalsten)

  1. abnormal

Declension

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Further reading

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  • abnormal” in Duden online
  • abnormal” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Indonesian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Dutch abnormal, from English abnormal or German abnormal. Equivalent to ab- +‎ normal.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ap̚ˈnɔr.mal/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes: -mal
  • Hyphenation: ab‧nor‧mal

Adjective

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abnormal (comparative lebih abnormal, superlative paling abnormal or terabnormal, equative seabnormal)

  1. abnormal
    1. not conforming to rule or system; deviating from the usual or normal type
    2. of or pertaining to that which is irregular, in particular, behaviour that deviates from norms of social propriety or accepted standards of mental health

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Malay

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Etymology

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From English abnormal.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ab.nor.mal]
  • Hyphenation: ab‧nor‧mal
  • Rhymes: -mal

Adjective

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abnormal (Jawi spelling ابنورمل)

  1. abnormal

Derived terms

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References

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Further reading

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Norwegian Bokmål

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Etymology

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From English abnormal, from Latin abnōrmis (departing from normal), from both ab- (away from, off), from ab (from, away from, of), from Proto-Italic *ab, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂epó (off, away), and from nōrma (norm, standard; rule, precept) (with the suffix -is), from Etruscan, from Ancient Greek γνώμων (gnṓmōn, examiner, carpenter's square), from γιγνώσκω (gignṓskō, I am aware of) (with the suffix -μων (-mōn, I am aware of), from Proto-Indo-European *-mō), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵiǵneh₃- (with the suffix -σκω (-skō), from Proto-Indo-European *-sḱéti), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵneh₃- (to know). Equivalent to abnorm +‎ -al, suffix from French -al (-al), from Middle French, from Old French -al, from Latin -ālis, from Proto-Indo-European *-li-.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /abnɔrˈmɑːl/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑːl
  • Hyphenation: ab‧nor‧mal

Adjective

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abnormal (neuter singular abnormalt, definite singular and plural abnormale, comparative mer abnormal, superlative mest abnormal)

  1. abnormal (not conforming to rule or system; deviating from the usual or normal type.)
    • 1969, Naturen:
      normale og abnormale blodceller
      normal and abnormal blood cells
    • 1909, Henrik Ibsen, Efterladte Skrifter I, page 406:
      [de] abnormale mod skjønhedsideen stridende udvæxter
      [the] abnormal outgrowths contrary to the idea of beauty
    • 1967, Naturen, page 6:
      abnormalt høye varmestrømmer fra underhavene [områdene under verdenshavene]
      abnormally high heat flows from under the oceans [areas under the world's oceans]
    • 2015 February 18, scenekunst.no[X]:
      [han er] ikledd et absurd kontorantrekk fra 60-tallet med abnormalt høyt liv og et stripete slips
      [he is] wearing an absurd office suit from the 60's with abnormally high waist and a striped tie
    abnormal psykologi
    abnormal psychology
    Synonyms: anormal, unormal, uvanlig, usedvanlig, ualminnelig, overordentlig
    Antonyms: normal, vanlig, ordinær, gjennomsnittlig

References

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Tagalog

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English abnormal, originally as a pseudo-Hispanism as shown by ultimate stress. The correct Spanish counterpart is anormal.

Pronunciation

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  • (Standard Tagalog)
    • IPA(key): /ʔabnoɾˈmal/ [ʔɐb.noɾˈmal] (common)
    • IPA(key): /ʔabˈnoɾmal/ [ʔɐbˈnoːɾ.mɐl] (in code-switching speech)
  • Syllabification: ab‧nor‧mal

Adjective

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abnormál or abnormal (Baybayin spelling ᜀᜊ᜔ᜈᜓᜇ᜔ᜋᜎ᜔)

  1. abnormal; irregular
    Synonyms: di-karaniwan, di-normal

Usage notes

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  • The pronunciation /ʔabnoɾˈmal/ is the usual pronunciation attested in dictionaries and is commonly used.
  • The pronunciation /ʔabˈnoɾmal/ is commonly used in code-switching speech, especially by younger speakers.

Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • abnormal”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018