See also: Grates, gratés, and gråtes

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

grates

  1. plural of grate

VerbEdit

grates

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of grate

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

grates

  1. feminine plural of grat

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

grates

  1. second-person singular present indicative form of gratar

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *gʷerH- (to welcome, greet, praise). Cognates include Sanskrit गृणाति (gṛṇā́ti, to praise), Old Church Slavonic жрьти (žrĭti) and Old Prussian girtwei (to praise).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

grātēs f pl (genitive grātium); third declension

  1. thanks rendered, thanksgiving

Usage notesEdit

This noun originally appeared only in the nominative and accusative plural (The genitive, dative, and vocative plural are unattested and ablative plural only rarely) and was used with agō when rendering thanks to the gods. grātiās agō was generally used for thanks between humans.

DeclensionEdit

Not declined; used only in the nominative and accusative singular., singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative grātēs
Genitive
Dative
Accusative grātēs
Ablative
Vocative

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • grates in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • grates in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • grates in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • grates in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to give thanks to heaven: grates agere (dis immortalibus)
    • to thank, glorify the immortal gods: grates, laudes agere dis immortalibus