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See also: Brat, BRAT, brát, brãt, braț, and bråţ

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Early Modern English (ca. 1500) slang term meaning "beggar's child". Possibly from Scots bratchet (bitch, hound). Or, possibly originally a dialectal word, from northern and western England and the Midlands, for a "makeshift or ragged garment," from Old English bratt (cloak), which is from a Celtic source (Old Irish brat (cloak, cloth)).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɹat/
  • (US) enPR: brăt, IPA(key): /bɹæt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æt

NounEdit

brat (plural brats)

  1. (derogatory slang) A child who is regarded as mischievous, unruly, spoiled, or selfish.
    Get that little brat away from me!
  2. (slang) A son or daughter (at any age) of an active military service member.
    an army brat
  3. a turbot or flatfish
  4. (historical) A rough cloak or ragged garment
    • 1386, Geoffrey Chaucer, “Line 881”, in The Canon's Yeoman's Tale[1]:
      Whicħ þat þey myght / wrape hem in at nyght / And a brat / to walk in / by day-light
    • 1961, Audrey I. Barfoot, Everyday costume in Britain: from the earliest times to 1900, page 80:
      The chief's daughter wears a brat and léine girdled with a criss.
    • 2005, Seán Duffy, Medieval Ireland: An Encyclopedia, →ISBN, page 156:
      The prevailing style of dress in the early medieval period comprised a léine (tunic) worn under a brat (cloak).
    • 2006, Celtic Culture: A-Celti, →ISBN, page 1272:
      Women wore loose, flowing, ankle-length robes modelled on 11th-century European fashion (derived from what O'Neill called the léine) and, perhaps, a brat over these.
  5. (obsolete, Britain, Scotland, dialectal) A coarse kind of apron for keeping the clothes clean; a bib.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete) The young of an animal.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of L'Estrange to this entry?)
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Shortened from bratwurst, from German Bratwurst.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brat (plural brats)

  1. (informal) bratwurst
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

brat (plural brats)

  1. (mining) A thin bed of coal mixed with pyrites or carbonate of lime.

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

brat

  1. (military) Acronym of Born, Raised, And Transferred.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /brat/, [b̥ʁɑd̥]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse brantr, brattr, of uncertain origin, but possibly from Proto-Indo-European *bʰren- (project), related to Old English brant (steep), Latvian bruôds (roof ridge).

Cognate with Faroese and Icelandic brattur, Norwegian bratt, Swedish brant, and Old English brant, bront (English brant, brent, Scots brent).

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brat

  1. steep
InflectionEdit
Inflection of brat
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular brat brattere brattest2
Neuter singular brat brattere brattest2
Plural bratte brattere brattest2
Definite attributive1 bratte brattere bratteste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse brattr (steep) and merged with Old Norse bráðr (hasty, sudden), from Proto-Germanic *brēþaz (hot, in a hurry, rushed), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrē-, *bʰerē- (steam, vapour), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to seethe, toss about, cook).

AdjectiveEdit

brat

  1. sudden
InflectionEdit
Inflection of brat
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular brat brattere brattest2
Neuter singular brat brattere brattest2
Plural bratte brattere brattest2
Definite attributive1 bratte brattere bratteste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

ReferencesEdit

  • brat” in Den Danske Ordbog
  • “brat” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • Pokorny, Julius, Indogermanisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch, Tübingen: A. Francke Verlag, 1959.

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

brat

  1. Imperative singular of braten.
  2. (colloquial) First-person singular present of braten.

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish bratt, from Proto-Celtic *bratto- (compare Welsh brethyn (cloth), from *bratt-ino-).

NounEdit

brat m (genitive singular brait, nominative plural brait)

  1. mantle, cloak
    Proverb:
    Ná leath do bhrat ach mar is féidir leat a chonlú.
    Cut your coat according to your cloth.
    (literally, “Don’t spread your cloak farther than you can fold it.”)
  2. covering
  3. (theater) curtain
  4. Alternative form of bratach (flag)
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

brat m (genitive singular brat, nominative plural bratanna)

  1. broth; thick soup
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
brat bhrat mbrat
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


KashubianEdit

Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

brat

  1. supine of braś

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brat m pers (diminutive braciszek)

  1. brother
    • Uwspółcześniona Biblia Gdańska, Mark 1:16:
      A przechadzając się nad Morzem Galilejskim, zobaczył Szymona i Andrzeja, jego brata, zarzucających sieć w morze; byli bowiem rybakami.
      As Jesus was strolling beside the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and Andrew, his brother, casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • brat in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • brat in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish bratt, from Proto-Celtic *bratto- (compare Welsh brethyn (cloth), from *bratt-ino-).

NounEdit

brat m (genitive singular brata, plural bratan)

  1. cloak, cover, covering, mantle, veil, canopy
  2. mat

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
brat bhrat
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brȁt m (Cyrillic spelling бра̏т)

  1. brother
  2. mate, pal, buddy, when used in informal speech to address somebody in vocative (brate)

Usage notesEdit

There is no plural form for this noun. Instead, the collective term brȁća is used for plural meanings.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brat m (genitive singular brata, nominative plural bratia, genitive plural bratov, declension pattern of chlap)

  1. brother

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • brat in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brȁt m anim

  1. brother

InflectionEdit

Masculine anim., hard o-stem
nom. sing. brȁt
gen. sing. bráta
singular dual plural
nominative brȁt bráta brátje
bráti
accusative bráta bráta bráte
genitive bráta brátov brátov
dative brátu brátoma brátom
locative brátu brátih brátih
instrumental brátom brátoma bráti

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English brat (spoiled child).

NounEdit

brat c

  1. (slang) person who is very careful about following fashion trends; someone who rarely ever acts independently but rather follows peer pressure, usually maintaining an appearance of visible wealth

Usage notesEdit

  • Mainly used in plural, as a collective noun.
  • Can occasionally be seen considered as neuter rather than common.

SynonymsEdit