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See also: gäster

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin gaster, Ancient Greek γαστήρ (gastḗr)

NounEdit

gaster (plural gasters)

  1. the stomach
  2. the part of the abdomen behind the petiole in hymenopterous insects

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek γαστήρ (gastḗr).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gaster f (variously declined, genitive gasteris or gastrī); third declension, second declension

  1. belly

InflectionEdit

Third declension.
Case Singular Plural
nominative gaster gasterēs
genitive gasteris gasterum
dative gasterī gasteribus
accusative gasterem gasterēs
ablative gastere gasteribus
vocative gaster gasterēs
Second declension, nominative singular in -er.
Case Singular Plural
nominative gaster gastrī
genitive gastrī gastrōrum
dative gastrō gastrīs
accusative gastrum gastrōs
ablative gastrō gastrīs
vocative gaster1 gastrī
1May also be gastre.

ReferencesEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Latin vastāre, present active infinitive of vastō. The initial g is under the influence of Frankish *wuostjan, *wuastjan, itself from Latin vastō or from the same pre-Latin source.

VerbEdit

gaster

  1. to waste (not make good use of)
  2. to destroy

ConjugationEdit

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vastāre, present active infinitive of vastō. The initial g is under the influence of Frankish *wuostjan, *wuastjan, itself from Latin vastō or from the same pre-Latin source.

VerbEdit

gaster

  1. to waste (not make good use of)
  2. to destroy

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-sts, *-stt are modified to z, st. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit