See also: Haw, Haw., hAw, and HAw

TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

haw

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Hawaiian.

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ha (interjection). Compare Old Norse (interjection), Middle Low German ha, (interjection), Old High German aha, hei (interjection).

InterjectionEdit

haw

  1. An imitation of laughter, often used to express scorn or disbelief. Often doubled or tripled (haw haw or haw haw haw).
    You think that song was good? Haw!
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt, Olympia Press:
      The bitter laugh laughs at that which is not good, it is the ethical laugh. The hollow laugh laughs at that which is not true, it is the intellectual laugh. Not good! Not true! Well well. But the mirthless laugh is the dianoetic laugh, down the snout — Haw! — so.
  2. An intermission or hesitation of speech, with a sound somewhat like "haw"; the sound so made.
Usage notesEdit
  • (an imitation of laughter): In the US, haw is rare (it was more used in the past), with ha being more common.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

haw (third-person singular simple present haws, present participle hawing, simple past and past participle hawed)

  1. To stop, in speaking, with a sound like haw; to speak with interruption and hesitation.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English hawe, from Old English haga (enclosure, hedge), from Proto-Germanic *hagô (compare West Frisian haach, Dutch haag, German Hag (hedged farmland), Norwegian Bokmål hage (garden)), from Proto-Indo-European *kagʰom (compare Welsh cae (hedge), Latin caulae (sheepfold, enclosure), cohum (strap between plowbeam and yoke), Russian кош (koš, tent), коша́ра (košára, sheepfold), Sanskrit कक्ष (kakṣa, curtain wall)), from *kagʰ- 'to catch, grasp' (compare Welsh cau (to clasp), Oscan kahad (may he seize).

NounEdit

haw (plural haws)

  1. Fruit of the hawthorn.
    Synonym: hawthorn berry
  2. (historical) A hedge.
  3. (obsolete) Something that has little value or importance; a whit or jot.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Assumed to be interjectory, but compare Old English hawian (to observe, look)[1]

InterjectionEdit

haw

  1. An instruction for a horse or other animal to turn towards the driver, typically left.
    Coordinate term: gee
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

haw (third-person singular simple present haws, present participle hawing, simple past and past participle hawed)

  1. (of an animal) To turn towards the driver, typically to the left.
    This horse won't haw when I tell him to.
    Antonym: gee
  2. To cause (an animal) to turn left.
    You may have to go to the front of the pack and physically haw the lead dog.
    Antonym: gee
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^
    1889–91, “haw”, in William Dwight Whitney, editor, The Century Dictionary: An Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language [], volume (please specify |volume=I to VI), New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., OCLC 977635331:

Etymology 4Edit

Late Middle English (denoting a discharge from the eye), of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Etymology 2 above, describing a berry.[1]

NounEdit

haw (countable and uncountable, plural haws)

  1. (countable, anatomy) The third eyelid, or nictitating membrane.
  2. (uncountable) A disease of the nictitating membrane.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for haw in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^
    1889–91, “haw”, in William Dwight Whitney, editor, The Century Dictionary: An Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language [], volume (please specify |volume=I to VI), New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., OCLC 977635331:

AnagramsEdit


JingphoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Burmese ဟော (hau:).

VerbEdit

haw

  1. to preach

ReferencesEdit

  • Kurabe, Keita (2016-12-31), “Phonology of Burmese loanwords in Jinghpaw”, in Kyoto University Linguistic Research[1], volume 35, DOI:10.14989/219015, ISSN 1349-7804, pages 91–128

KalashaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit हल (hala), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰh₁ol-. Cognate with Lithuanian žúolis.

NounEdit

haw

  1. plough

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

haw

  1. Alternative form of hawe

ScanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse haf, from Proto-Germanic *habą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

haw n (definite singular haweð, plural haw)

  1. sea

Derived termsEdit


ZhuangEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Borrowed from Chinese ?”

NounEdit

haw (Sawndip forms 𰁴 or 𫣞 or ⿰土黑, 1957–1982 spelling həɯ)

  1. fair; market

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Chinese (MC hɨʌ).

AdjectiveEdit

haw (1957–1982 spelling həɯ)

  1. weak; feeble