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Alemannic GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German heim, from Proto-Germanic *haimaz. Cognate with German Heim, Dutch heem, English home, Danish hjem, also Albanian komb.

NounEdit

heim n

  1. (Gressoney) home

ReferencesEdit

  • “heim” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɦɛi̯m/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛi̯m

NounEdit

heim n (plural heimen, diminutive heimpje n)

  1. Alternative form of heem

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse heim, from heimr, from Proto-Germanic *haimaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

heim n (genitive singular heims, plural heim)

  1. home
  2. hostel
  3. asylum

DeclensionEdit

Declension of heim
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative heim heimið heim heimini
accusative heim heimið heim heimini
dative heimi heiminum heimum heimunum
genitive heims heimsins heima heimanna

Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

heim (not comparable)

  1. home, homeward

Related termsEdit

  • heima (at home)
  • heim aftur (back home again)
  • heiman (away from home)
  • heim til húsa (homward to the house)
  • ikki bera boðini heim (not return alive; not carry the message home)

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Heim (home).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

heim

  1. home; always as a direction, thus never in the sense of at home

Usage notesEdit

  • The adverb is used chiefly with verbs of movement, to which it is joined in spelling in infinite and sub-clause forms. (See derived terms below.) Uses independent from verbs are rare but not impossible. For example: der Weg heim zu Gott (“the way home to God”).
  • The frequence of heim varies by region. It is a very frequent word in southern Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, but is less common in central Germany and even quite rare in the north. These regions prefer nach Hause instead.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • heim in Duden online

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse heim (home, homewards), the accusative form of heimr (abode, world, land), from Proto-Germanic *haimaz.

AdverbEdit

heim

  1. home
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

heim

  1. indefinite accusative singular of heimur

LimburgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch hêem, heim, from Old Dutch hēm, heim, from Proto-Germanic *haimaz.

NounEdit

heim n

  1. home
  2. house

InflectionEdit

Inflection
Root singular Root plural Diminutive singular Diminutive plural
Nominative heim heimer heimke heimkes
Genitive heims heimer heimkes heimkes
Locative heives heiveser heiveske heiveskes
Dative¹ heivem heimer heivemske heivemskes
Accusative¹ heim heimern heimke heimkes
  • Dative and accusative are nowadays obsolete, use nominative instead.

See alsoEdit


LudianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Akin to Finnish heimo.

NounEdit

heim

  1. ribe

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse heim, heimr, from Proto-Germanic *haimaz.

NounEdit

heim m (definite singular heimen, indefinite plural heimer, definite plural heimene)

  1. home
  2. nursing home, hostel
  3. world (rare)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse heim.

AdverbEdit

heim

  1. home
    Nå går vi heim.
    We go home now.
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse heim, heimr, from Proto-Germanic *haimaz. Akin to English home.

NounEdit

heim m (definite singular heimen, indefinite plural heimar, definite plural heimane)

  1. home
  2. nursing home, hostel
  3. world
  4. Place of origin or belonging. Similar to German Heimat.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse heim.

AdverbEdit

heim

  1. home
    No går me heim.
    We go home now.
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

An accusative form of heimr (abode, world, land), from Proto-Germanic *haimaz. Compare Old Saxon hēm, Old English hām, Old High German heim, Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌹𐌼𐍃 (haims).

AdverbEdit

heim

  1. home, homewards
    Flosi var allra manna glaðastr ok beztr heim at sækja.
    Flosi was most cheerful of all men and the best to visit.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • heim in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

WestrobothnianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse heimr (dative heimi), from Proto-Germanic *haimaz. Akin to English home.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hêim n (definite singular heime, dative heimen)

  1. home
  2. whereabouts
  3. crop harvested near one's farm

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse heim.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

heim

  1. home
    Jig går haim.
    I'm going home.
    Sko jö fåli de heim?
    Shall I follow you home?

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse heima.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

hêim

  1. at home
    Han jär int haim.
    He is not home.
    Hvórs jär du haim?
    Where do you live?
    Ji vait int hódt’n jär heim.
    I know not whether he's home.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Rietz, Johan Ernst, “heim, haim, häim”, “heim, haim”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 250, 251