See also: TIL, 'til, and тіл

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English til, from Old English til (to, until), possibly from Old Norse til, both from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at). Compare to Old Frisian til

Alternative formsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

til

  1. (nonstandard) until, till
    c1390, Geoffry Chaucer, “The Canterbury Tales”: 
    He slepeth...Al nyght til the sonne gan aryse.
    2010 May, James Parker, “Revenge of the Wimps”, The Atlantic Monthly, volume 305, number 4, page 38: 
    EVEN IF YOU MAKE ME WRITE IN THIS EVERY DAY TIL THEY LET ME OUT OF HERE

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. (nonstandard) until, till
    1425, Wycliffe, “Ezekial 1:27”, in Wycliffe Bible:
    Fro þe leendis of hym & aboue, & fro þe leendis of him til beneþe I saᵹ þe licnesse of fier.
    2004 Nov, “The Role of Close Friends in African American Adolescents' Dating and Sexual Behavior”, Journal of Sex Research, volume 41, number 4, page 351-362: 
    I just don't know how to just come out in the blue and say it, so I just wait til it comes up...
    2008 Winter, Michael Copperman, “Gone”, Arkansas Review, volume 39, number 3, Arkansas State University, page 139-145: 
    Let him wander round and kids gone meddle him til he get to fighting again.
  2. (archaic) ~ to: as far as; down to; up to, until
    1425, Wycliffe, “Ezekial 40:15”, in Wycliffe Bible:
    He maad frountis by sixti cubitis ... and bifore the face of the ᵹate that lastid til to the face of the porche of the ynner ᵹate, fifti cubitis.

AnagramsEdit


Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *dɨl.

NounEdit

til

  1. tongue
  2. language

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse til, from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at).

AdverbEdit

til

  1. more
  2. additional
  3. another
  4. towards

ConjunctionEdit

til

  1. untill
  2. till

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. to (clarification of this Danish definition is being sought)
  2. for (towards)
  3. at (clarification of this Danish definition is being sought)
  4. by (clarification of this Danish definition is being sought)
  5. with (clarification of this Danish definition is being sought)
  6. as (clarification of this Danish definition is being sought)

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

til

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tillen
  2. imperative of tillen

Dutch Low SaxonEdit

NounEdit

til

  1. bridge

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse, from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at).

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. (with accusative or with genitive) to (clarification of this Faroese definition is being sought)

ConjunctionEdit

til

  1. until

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

til

  1. Romanization of 𐍄𐌹𐌻

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse, from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. (with genitive) to, towards
    Ég fer til Japans.
    I'm going to Japan.
    Ég er með bréf til þín.
    I have a letter [addressed] to you.

Derived termsEdit


KurdishEdit

til

NounEdit

til f

  1. finger (extremity of the hand)


This Kurdish entry was created from the translations listed at finger. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see til in the Kurdish Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) April 2008



LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

til

  1. rafsi of tcila.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse, from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at).

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. to (clarification of this Norwegian Bokmål definition is being sought)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse, from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at).

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. to (indicating destination)
    Dei er på veg til fylkesgrensa.
    They are on their way to the county border.
  2. to (indicating purpose)

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Proto-Germanic *tila-, whence also Old Frisian til, Old High German zil (German Ziel), Old Norse tilr, Gothic 𐍄𐌹𐌻 (til).

AdjectiveEdit

til

  1. good (morally good; competent; useful, etc)
    Til sceal mid tilum. — The good shall be with the good.

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly from Old Norse til[1] tho the OED has it as "Germanic" and related to Old Norse and to Old Frisian til[2]

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. to, until, unto
    Ðá cueð til him ðe Hǽlend — Then quoth unto them the Savior.

NounEdit

til n (nominative plural tilas)

  1. use, service, convenience
    Gewritu secgaþ ðæt seó wiht sý mid moncynne miclum ticlum sweotol and gesýne, sundorcræft hafaþ. — Writings say that those beings were to mankind of great service; they clearly and obviously had special powers.
  2. goodness, kindness
    Me on ðínum tile gelǽr ðæt ic teala cunne ðín sóðfæst weorc healdan. — Thy goodness teaches me that I should maintain your righteous work.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ till” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1884-1928, and First Supplement, 1933

Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *til (to, towards). Cognate with Old English til, Old Frisian til.

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. (with genitive) to, towards

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

Examples

não (no), cão (dog), chão (floor), pão (bread), mão (hand), perdão (pardon), limão (lemon), irmão (brother), irmã (sister), pinhão (pine seed), algodão (cotton), corações (hearts), manhã (morning), Guimarães, Camões

EtymologyEdit

From Old Provençal tille, from Latin titulus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

til m (plural tis, or tiles)

  1. tilde, a diacritic (˜). Used in Portuguese to indicate a nasal vowel.
  2. trifle (something of little importance or worth)

UzbekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *dɨl.

NounEdit

til (plural tillar)

  1. tongue
  2. language
Last modified on 30 March 2014, at 14:56