See also: TIL, 'til, til-, and тіл

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English til, from Old English til (to, until), possibly from Old Norse til, both from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), or Proto-Germanic *til (to, towards). Compare to Old Frisian til.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

til

  1. (colloquial) until, till
    • 2010 May, Parker, James, “Revenge of the Wimps”, in The Atlantic Monthly[1], volume 305, number 4, page 38:
      EVEN IF YOU MAKE ME WRITE IN THIS EVERY DAY TIL THEY LET ME OUT OF HERE

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. (colloquial) until, till
    • 2004 Nov, “The Role of Close Friends in African American Adolescents' Dating and Sexual Behavior”, in Journal of Sex Research, volume 41, number 4, page 351-362:
      I just don't know how to just come out in the blue and say it, so I just wait til it comes up...
    • 2008 Winter, Copperman, Michael, “Gone”, in Arkansas Review, volume 39, number 3, Arkansas State University, page 139-145:
      Let him wander round and kids gone meddle him til he get to fighting again.
  2. (archaic) ~ to: as far as; down to; up to, until

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

til (plural tils)

  1. The sesame plant
  2. A species of tree in the Lauraceae family, native to Madeira and the Canary Islands; Ocotea foetens.
See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *dɨl.

NounEdit

til

  1. tongue
  2. language

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[2], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse til, from Proto-Germanic *tilą (goal), cognate with Swedish till (to), English till, German Ziel n (goal). The preposition has arisen from an adverbial use of the noun, lit. "(with) the goal of something". In Old Norse, the preposition governs the genitive, a usage which is preserved in certain fixed phrased in Danish.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /te(l)/, [tˢel], [tˢe]

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. to, towards (direction or goal of a physical movement)
  2. towards (the way a thing is turned)
  3. to, until (the upper limit)
    Fra 12 til 18 år.
    From 12 to 18 years.
  4. for (the purpose or the beneficiary)
    Jeg har en gave til dig.
    I have a gift for you.
  5. into, interested in (especially sexually)
    Beklager, jeg er kun til kvinder.
    Sorry, I'm only into women.
    Er du til analsex?
    Are you into anal sex?
  6. at (at a certain point in time, with certain nouns)
    De var samlet hele familien til jul.
    The whole family was gathered at Christmas.
  7. by, by (not later than)
    Den er færdig til (på) torsdag.
    It is ready by Thursday.
  8. (together) with (e.g. accompanying food)
    De drak vin til maden
    They were drinking wine with their food.
  9. on, by (the mean of transportation)

Archaic case formsEdit

  • The preposition governed the genitive in Old Norse and Old Danish. This usage is preserved in several fixed phrases (always with the noun in the indefinite singular):
  • In many phrases, the noun ends in -e, which is either 1) an old genitive plural (Old Norse -a), 2) an old genitive singular in a different declension (Old Norse -ar), or 3) an old dative singular (Old Norse -i), analogically after other case relict phrases:

AdverbEdit

til

  1. more, additional, another
    Giv mig en kage til.
    Give me another cake.
  2. to, having as destination
    Gå hen til huset.
    Go to the house.
  3. such that something is caused to be in a fitting state
    • 2015, Christine Proksch, Turen Går Til Wien, Politikens Forlag →ISBN
      Kalkstenen smuldrer og skal erstattes, og uafbrudt skyder stilladser i vejret, så der kan slibes til og skiftes ud.
      The limestone crumbles and must be replaced, and scaffolds pop up unceasingly, so that grinding and replacing can take place.
    • 2008, Selvstyrende team - ledelse og organisation, Samfundslitteratur →ISBN, page 35
      Det betyder, at personligheden skal slibes til, sådan at den passer optimalt ind i den konkrete jobprofil, hvilket sker på bekostning af det personlige udtryk.
      This means that personality must be grinded, such that it fits optimally into the job profile in question, which happens at the cost of personal expression.
  4. such that some pathway or cavity is blocked
    Kloakken er stoppet til.
    The sewer is blocked.
  5. with force
    Tryk til!
    Push forcefully!

ConjunctionEdit

til

  1. till, until
    Jeg venter til det bliver mørkt.
    I shall wait till it is dark.

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɪl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

til f (plural tillen, diminutive tilletje n)

  1. dovecote
    Synonyms: duiventil, columbarium, duivenhuis
  2. (dialectal) bridge, typically a small wooden bridge made of planks
  3. (dated) cage trap for catching birds

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

til

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tillen
  2. imperative of tillen

Dutch Low SaxonEdit

NounEdit

til

  1. bridge

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse til, from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. (with accusative or with genitive) to, towards

Derived termsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

til

  1. until

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

til

  1. Romanization of 𐍄𐌹𐌻

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse til, from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. (governs the genitive) to, towards
    Ég fer til Japans.
    I'm going to Japan.
    Ég er með bréf til þín.
    I have a letter [addressed] to you.

Derived termsEdit


IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English till.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. until, till (in time)
  2. to, up to, as far as (in space)

Derived termsEdit

  • til rivido! (goodbye!, literally until the re-seeing!)

InterjectionEdit

til

  1. Short for til rivido (goodbye).

MarshalleseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Micronesian *sulu, from Proto-Oceanic *suluq, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *suluq. Cognate with Cebuano sulo, Tagalog sulo, Malay suluh, Palauan tuich.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

til

  1. a torch

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English til (to, until), possibly from Old Norse til, both from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), or Proto-Germanic *til (to, towards). Cognate with Old Norse til, Old Frisian til.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

til

  1. until, till
    • a. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “The Man of Law's Tale”, in The Canterbury Tales, line 788-791:
      [] And plesed hym in al that ever she myghte. / He drank, and wel his girdel underpighte; / He slepeth, and he fnorteth in his gyse / Al nyght, til the sonne gan aryse.
      [] and she pleased him with everything she possibly could. / He drank, and his belt became stuffed well; / he slept, and snorted like he usually did / throughout the night, until the sun arose.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: til, till
  • Scots: til

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. until, till
    • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “Ezechiel 1:27”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
      And Y ſiȝ as a licneſſe of electre, as the biholding of fier with ynne, bi the cumpas therof; fro the lendis of hym and aboue, and fro þe lendis of him til to bynethe, Y siȝ as the licneſſe of fier ſchynynge in cumpas, []
      And I saw something like amber, which had something fire spread around within it. From above his torso and his torso up to the bottom (of him), I saw something like fire shining around him, []
  2. (with "to") as far as; down to; up to, until
    • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “Ezechiel 40:14-15”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
      [] and bifore the face of the ȝate that laſtid til to the face of the porche of the ynner ȝate, he mad fifti cubitis.
      And from in front of the gate's front up to the porch of the inner gate, he measured fifty cubits.

DescendantsEdit


Northern KurdishEdit

 
til

NounEdit

til f

  1. finger (extremity of the hand)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse til, from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. to
    fra ... til ... - from ... to ...

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse til, from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. to (indicating destination)
    Dei er på veg til fylkesgrensa.
    They are on their way to the county border.
  2. for
    Denne presangen er til deg.
    This present is for you.
  3. of (indicating possession)
    Han er faren til guten.
    He is the father of the boy.
  4. until
    Me køyrde til me kom fram.
    We drove until we got there.

AdverbEdit

til

  1. another, one more
    Eg tek eit kakestykke til.
    I'll take another piece of cake.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *tila-, whence also Old Frisian til, Old High German zil (German Ziel), Old Norse tilr, Gothic 𐍄𐌹𐌻 (til).

AdjectiveEdit

til

  1. good (morally good; competent; useful, etc.)
    Til sceal mid tilum.
    The good shall be with the good.
DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

til n (nominative plural tilas)

  1. use, service, convenience
    Gewritu secgaþ ðæt seó wiht sý mid moncynne miclum ticlum sweotol and gesýne, sundorcræft hafaþ.
    Writings say that those beings were to mankind of great service; they clearly and obviously had special powers.
  2. goodness, kindness
    Me on ðínum tile gelǽr ðæt ic teala cunne ðín sóðfæst weorc healdan.
    Thy goodness teaches me that I should maintain your righteous work.

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly from Old Norse til[1] though the OED has it as "Germanic" and related to Old Norse til and to Old Frisian til[2]

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. to, until, unto
    Ðá cueð til him ðe Hǽlend
    Then quoth unto them the Savior.
    • c. 800, Ruthwell Cross, found in Ruthwell, Scotland.
      ᛣᚱᛁᛋᛏ ᚹᚫᛋ ᚩᚾ ᚱᚩᛞᛁ ᚻᚹᛖᚦᚱᚨ / ᚦᛖᚱ ᚠᚢᛋᚨ ᚠᛠᚱᚱᚪᚾ ᛣᚹᚩᛗᚢ / ᚨᚦᚦᛁᛚᚨ ᛏᛁᛚ ᚪᚾᚢᛗ
      Krist wæs on rodi. Hweþræ'/ þer fusæ fearran kwomu / æþþilæ til anum.
      Christ was on the cross. Yet / the brave came there from afar / to their lord.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ till” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *til (to, towards). Cognate with Old English til, Old Frisian til.

PrepositionEdit

til

  1. (with genitive) to, towards

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • til in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • “til” in: Richard Cleasby, Guðbrandur Vigfússon — An Icelandic-English Dictionary (1874)

PortugueseEdit

Examples

não (no), cão (dog), chão (floor), pão (bread), mão (hand), perdão (pardon), limão (lemon), irmão (brother), irmã (sister), pinhão (pine seed), algodão (cotton), corações (hearts), manhã (morning), Guimarães, Camões

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan tille, from Latin titulus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

til m (plural tis or tiles)

  1. tilde, a diacritic (˜). Used in Portuguese to indicate a nasal vowel.
  2. trifle (something of little importance or worth)

UzbekEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic тил
Roman til
Perso-Arabic ‍‍

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *dɨl.

NounEdit

til (plural tillar)

  1. tongue
  2. language

DeclensionEdit