EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin ignītus, past participle of igniō, ignire (to set on fire, ignite), from Latin ignis (fire), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁n̥gʷnis, and thus related to Sanskrit अग्नि (agní), Lithuanian ugnis, and Russian ого́нь (ogónʹ).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ĭgnīt', IPA(key): /ɪɡˈnaɪt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪt

VerbEdit

ignite (third-person singular simple present ignites, present participle igniting, simple past and past participle ignited)

  1. (transitive) to set fire to (something), to light (something)
  2. (transitive) to spark off (something), to trigger
    • 2005, Mick Fowler, On Thin Ice: Alpine Climbs in the Americas, Asia and the Himalaya:
      Our observations on the way up had been mixed but the deep, crisp cold of the Peruvian night followed by a crystal clear dawn re-ignited our enthusiasm and sent us scampering across the frozen snow bowl []
  3. (intransitive) to commence burning.
  4. (chemistry, transitive) To subject to the action of intense heat; to heat strongly; often said of incombustible or infusible substances.
    to ignite iron or platinum

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ignite f pl

  1. feminine plural of ignito

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

ignīte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of igniō