infernal

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French infernal, from Latin infernālis, from infernus (below, subterranean).

AdjectiveEdit

infernal (comparative more infernal, superlative most infernal)

  1. Of or relating to hell, or the world of the dead; hellish.
  2. (by extension) Of or relating to a fire or inferno.
  3. Stygian, gloomy.
  4. Diabolical or fiendish.
    • Addison
      the instruments or abettors in such infernal dealings
  5. (as an expletive, not vulgar) Very annoying; damned.
    • 1905, Bram Stoker, The Man
      As I had to put up with the patronage and the lecturings, and the eyeglass of that infernal old woman, []

Related termsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

infernal (plural infernals)

  1. (obsolete) An inhabitant of the infernal regions.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Drayton to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin infernalis

AdjectiveEdit

infernal m (feminine infernale, masculine plural infernaux, feminine plural infernales)

  1. infernal (relating to hell)
  2. (figuratively) infernal, hellish, awful, terrible

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin infernālis

AdjectiveEdit

infernal m (feminine infernale)

  1. infernal (relating to hell)

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin infernalis

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

infernal m, f (plural infernales)

  1. infernal

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 13 April 2014, at 04:21