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See also: he'll and Hell

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English helle, from Old English hel, hell, helle (nether world, abode of the dead, hell), from Proto-Germanic *haljō (nether world, concealed place), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, conceal, save). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Hälle (hell), German Low German Hell (hell), Dutch hel (hell), German Hölle (hell), Swedish helvete (hell), Icelandic hel (the abode of the dead, death). Also related to the Hel of Germanic mythology. See also hele.

Proper nounEdit

hell

  1. In various religions, the place where some or all spirits are believed to go after death
    Some religious people believe that all the followers of the other religions go to hell.
  2. (Abrahamic religions, uncountable) The place where devils live and where sinners suffer after death
    May you rot in hell!
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost
      Better to reign in Hell than serve in Heaven.
    • 1916, James Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
      Hell is a strait and dark and foul-smelling prison, an abode of demons and lost souls, filled with fire and smoke.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
  • (in Abrahamic religions, uncountable): heaven
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

hell (countable and uncountable, plural hells)

  1. (countable, hyperbolic) A place or situation of great suffering in life.
    My new boss is making my job a hell.
    I went through hell to get home today.
    • 1879, General William T. Sherman, commencement address at the Michigan Military Academy
      There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell.
    • 1986, Metallica (music), “Disposable Heroes”, in Master of Puppets:
      Why, am I dying? / Kill, have no fear / Lie, live off lying / Hell, hell is here
  2. (countable) A place for gambling.
    • W. Black
      a convenient little gambling hell for those who had grown reckless
    • 1907, Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent
      [] the air of moral nihilism common to keepers of gambling hells and disorderly houses; []
  3. An extremely hot place.
    You don't have a snowball's chance in hell.
  4. Used as an intensifier in phrases grammatically requiring a noun
    I'm as mad as hell and I'm not going to take it any more.
    What the hell is wrong with you?!
    He says he's going home early? Like hell he is.
  5. (obsolete) A place into which a tailor throws his shreds, or a printer his broken type.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hudibras to this entry?)
  6. In certain games of chase, a place to which those who are caught are carried for detention.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

hell

  1. (impolite, sometimes considered vulgar) Used to express discontent, unhappiness, or anger.
    Oh, hell! I got another parking ticket.
  2. (impolite, sometimes considered vulgar) Used to emphasize.
    Hell, yeah!
  3. (impolite, sometimes considered vulgar) Used to introduce an intensified statement following an understated one; nay; not only that, but.
    [Do it, or, r]est assured, there will be no more Middle Eastern crisis – hell, there will be no more Middle East!
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From German hellen (to brighten, burnish). Related to Dutch hel (clear, bright) and German hell (clear, bright).

VerbEdit

hell (third-person singular simple present hells, present participle helling, simple past and past participle helled)

  1. (rare, metal-working) To add luster to, burnish (silver or gold).
    • G. Smith (1799)
      To hell gold or gilt workː take two ounces of tartar, two ounces of sulfur.. and it will give it a fine luster.
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse hella (to pour). Cognate with Icelandic hella (to pour), Norwegian helle (to pour), Swedish hälla (to pour). See also hield.

VerbEdit

hell (third-person singular simple present hells, present participle helling, simple past and past participle helled)

  1. (rare) To pour.
    • Harvest (1821)
      Gosh, the sickle went into me handː Down hell'd the blood.
ReferencesEdit

AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *skōla, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kol- (stake); compare Lithuanian kuõlas, Polish kóɫ, Ancient Greek σκύλος (skúlos).

NounEdit

hell m

  1. skewer
  2. spear
  3. icicle

CornishEdit

NounEdit

hell

  1. Aspirate mutation of kell.

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of Finnic origin. Cognate to Finnish hellä and Votic ellä.

AdjectiveEdit

hell (genitive hella, partitive hella)

  1. tender, gentle

DeclensionEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Dutch hel.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hell (comparative heller, superlative am hellsten)

  1. clear, bright, light
    • 1918, Elisabeth von Heyking, Die Orgelpfeifen, in: Zwei Erzählungen, Phillipp Reclam jun. Verlag, page 9:
      So dunkel und schauerlich die Gruft aussah, wenn man durch die blinden, bestaubten Scheibchen der kleinen Fenster hineinblickte, so hell und freundlich war oben die Kirche.
      Just as dark and eerie the crypt looked like, if one looked in it through the cloudy, dusted little panes of the small windows, as bright and friendly was the church above.

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • hell in Duden online

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German hel. Cognate with German helle, Dutch hel.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hell (masculine hellen, neuter hellt, comparative méi hell, superlative am hellsten)

  1. clear, bright
  2. light, pale

DeclensionEdit


NorwegianEdit

NounEdit

hell n

  1. luck

Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

hell

  1. imperative of helle

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *haljō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, hide, conceal). Cognate with Old Frisian helle, hille, Old Saxon hel, hellia, Old Dutch hella, Old High German hella, hellia, Old Norse hel, Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌻𐌾𐌰 (halja).

Compare hell, German for "light".

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hell f

  1. hell

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit