See also: tré, trè, trẻ, trę, tré-, and tře

EnglishEdit

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NounEdit

tre (plural tres)

  1. (music) Alternative form of tres (A three-course stringed instrument similar to a guitar; the Cuban variant has six strings, and the Puerto Rican has nine.)

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Albanian cardinal numbers
 <  2 3 4  > 
    Cardinal : tre
    Ordinal : tretë

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *treje, from Proto-Indo-European *tréyes. Cognate to Latin trēs (three) and Sanskrit त्रि (tri, three).

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

tre

  1. three

Related termsEdit


BretonEdit

AdverbEdit

tre

  1. very
    Mat-tre!
    Very good!

DanishEdit

Danish cardinal numbers
 <  2 3 4  > 
    Cardinal : tre
    Ordinal : tredje

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þrír, from Proto-Norse ᚦᚱᛁᛃᛟᛉ f pl (þrijoz), from Proto-Germanic *þrīz, from Proto-Indo-European *tréyes (three)

The modern Danish form is a merger of the original East Old Norse accusative masculine þrēa (West þrjá) and the nominative/accusative feminine þrēaʀ (West þrjár).

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

tre

  1. three

Further readingEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French très.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [tre]
  • Audio:
    (file)
  • Hyphenation: tre

AdverbEdit

tre

  1. very

DescendantsEdit

  • Ido: tre

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Esperanto treFrench très.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

tre

  1. very

ItalianEdit

Italian cardinal numbers
 <  2 3 4  > 
    Cardinal : tre
    Ordinal : terzo
    Multiplier : triplo
    Fractional : terzo

EtymologyEdit

From Latin trēs, from Proto-Italic *trēs, from Proto-Indo-European *tréyes.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

tre (invariable)

  1. three

NounEdit

tre m (invariable)

  1. three

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Playing cards in Italian · carte da gioco (layout · text)
             
asso due tre quattro cinque sei sette
             
otto nove dieci fante donna,
regina
re jolly, joker,
matta

KalashaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit त्रयः (trayaḥ), from Proto-Indo-European *tréyes.

NumeralEdit

tre

  1. three; 3

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English trēow, from Proto-West Germanic *treu, in turn from Proto-Germanic *trewą. Ultimately descended from Proto-Indo-European *dóru.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tre (plural tres or treen)

  1. A tree or a plant that resembles one.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish tre, from Proto-Celtic *trē (compare Welsh trwy), from Proto-Indo-European *terh₂- (to pass through); compare Sanskrit तिरस् (tiras), Latin trāns and Gothic 𐌸𐌰𐌹𐍂𐌷 (þairh).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

tre (with the accusative; triggers lenition)

  1. through
    • c. 1000, Anonymous; published in (1935), Rudolf Thurneysen, editor, Scéla Mucca Meic Dathó, Dublin: Staionery Office, § 1, l. 11, page 1: “Secht ndoruis isin bruidin ocus secht sligeda trethe ocus secht tellaige indi ocus secht cori. [[There were] seven doors in the hall, and seven passages through it, and seven hearths in it, and seven cauldrons.]”

InflectionEdit

Forms combined with a definite article:

  • tríasin (through the m sg or f sg)

Forms combined with a possessive determiner:

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


NeapolitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tres. Compare Italian tre.

NumeralEdit

tre

  1. three

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Norwegian Bokmål cardinal numbers
 <  2 3 4  > 
    Cardinal : tre
    Ordinal : tredje

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse þrír, from Proto-Norse ᚦᚱᛁᛃᛟᛉ (þrijoz) (feminine plural), from Proto-Germanic *þrīz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *tréyes. Compare Danish and Swedish tre, Icelandic þrír, Faroese tríggir.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

tre

  1. three
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

From Old Norse tré (tree; beam), from Proto-Germanic *trewą (tree), from pre-Germanic *dréwom, from Proto-Indo-European *dóru (tree), possibly from *drew- (hard, firm, strong, solid).

The plurals trær and trærne are derived from Danish træ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tre n (definite singular treet, indefinite plural tre or trær, definite plural trea or trærne)

  1. tree
  2. wood
    Dette bordet er lagd av tre.
    This table is made of wood.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle Low German treden

VerbEdit

tre (imperative tre, present tense trer, passive tres, simple past trådte, past participle trådt, present participle tredende)

  1. to step (in, out etc.), to tread
    (military) Tre av! - Dismissed!
    (legislation etc.) tre i kraft - come into effect, come into force
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From tråd

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

tre (imperative tre, present tense trer, passive tres, simple past tredde, past participle tredd)

  1. to thread
    tre en nålthread a needle

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Norwegian Nynorsk cardinal numbers
 <  2 3 4  > 
    Cardinal : tre
    Ordinal : tredje

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse þrír, from Proto-Norse ᚦᚱᛁᛃᛟᛉ (þrijoz) (feminine plural), from Proto-Germanic *þrīz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *tréyes. Compare Danish and Swedish tre, Icelandic þrír, Faroese tríggir, English three.

Alternative formsEdit

  • tri (unofficial, høgnorsk)

NumeralEdit

tre

  1. three
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Old Norse tré, from Proto-Germanic *trewą, from Proto-Indo-European *dóru. Akin to English tree

NounEdit

tre n (definite singular treet, indefinite plural tre, definite plural trea)

  1. tree
    Trea i skogen var gamle.
    The trees in the forest were old.
  2. wood
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From earlier treda, from Middle Low German treden, from Proto-Germanic *trudaną. Doublet of trø and trå. Akin to English tread.

VerbEdit

tre (present tense trer, past tense tredde, supine tredd or trett, past participle tredd, present participle treande, imperative tre)

  1. (intransitive) to tread, step
    • 1878 June 19, “Peter Schlemihl”, in Fedraheimen, page 135:
      han skynade mi Meining og trod tvo Stig attende.
      He got the memo, and took two steps back.
ConjugationEdit

This verb is inflected as a short-formed weak e-verb, according to current standardization. The short form was introduced in 1959, and the weak past tense tredde was introduced in 1991, two developments made final by the reform of 2012. There is an outline of the development within the table below. The history is also intertwined with its semantically overlapping doublet, trå, as their inflections have been suppletive of each other.

Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

tre (present tense trer, past tense tredde, past participle tredd, imperative tre)

  1. Misspelling of træ.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *trē (compare Welsh trwy), from Proto-Indo-European *terh₂- (to pass through); compare Sanskrit तिरस् (tiras), Latin trāns and Gothic 𐌸𐌰𐌹𐍂𐌷 (þairh).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

tre (with the accusative; triggers lenition)

  1. through
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 3c2
      tri chretim i n-Ísu ꝉ isin beothu i táa Ísu iar n-esséirgu
      through belief in Jesus or in the life in which Jesus is after resurrection
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 77a12
      Air du·roimnibetar mo popuil-se a rrecht dia n‑uilemarbae-siu a náimtea .i. mani bé nech fris·chomarr doïbsom ⁊ ⟨du⟩da·imchomarr dia chomalnad tri fochaidi ⁊ ingraimmen.
      For my peoples will forget their law if you sg kill all their enemies, i.e. if there is no one who will hurt them and constrain them to fulfill it through tribulations and persecutions.

InflectionEdit

Forms combined with a definite article:

  • tris(s)in (through the m sg or f sg)
  • tris(s)a (through the n sg)
  • trisna (through the pl)

Forms combined with a possessive determiner:

Forms combined with a relative pronoun:

  • tresa (through which)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


PiedmonteseEdit

Piedmontese cardinal numbers
 <  2 3 4  > 
    Cardinal : tre

EtymologyEdit

From Latin trēs, from Proto-Italic *trēs. Cognates include Italian tre and French trois.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

tre

  1. three

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Short form of trebuie.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tre

  1. (informal) Alternative form of trebuie

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish tre (through), from Proto-Celtic *trē (compare Welsh trwy), from Proto-Indo-European *terh₂- (to pass through)

PrepositionEdit

tre

  1. through, by means of

SwedishEdit

Swedish cardinal numbers
 <  2 3 4  > 
    Cardinal : tre
    Ordinal : tredje

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish þrir, þrī, from Old Norse þrír, from Proto-Norse ᚦᚱᛁᛃᛟᛉ (þrijoz) (feminine plural), from Proto-Germanic *þrīz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *tréyes. Compare Norwegian and Danish tre, Icelandic þrír, Faroese tríggir.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

tre

  1. three

SynonymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


Tocharian AEdit

Previous: we, wu
Next: śtwar

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Tocharian [Term?], from Proto-Indo-European *tréyes. Cognate with Tocharian B trey, trai.

NumeralEdit

tre

  1. three

VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Vietic *k-lɛː. Compare also Proto-Katuic *ʔalɛɛ (type of bamboo) (whence Pacoh ale (small bamboo used for spears)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

(classifier cây) tre (𥯌, )

  1. bamboo

Related termsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tre f (plural trefi)

  1. Alternative form of tref

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tre dre nhre thre
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.