English edit

Noun edit

regina (plural reginas)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Regina (queen)
    • 1832, Thomas Nutt, “Bee-Boxes and Managament of Bees in them”, in Humanity to Honey Bees: or, Practical Directions for the Management of Honey Bees upon an Improved and Humane Plan, [], Wisbech, Cambridgeshire: [] H. and J. Leach, [], pages 34 and 37:
      In this box the regina of the colony, surrounded by her harmonious, cleanly, industrious, skilful subjects, carries on her part of procreation, and finally hatches her numerous progeny, called by Bee-masters the larvæ. [] The Bees will immediately commence their operations in their new apartment. Thus swarming is effectually prevented; and thus the Queen gains a vast addition to her dominions, and consequently additional space for the population of her momentarily enlarged domicile. There is now no want of store-house room, nor of employment, for our indefatigable labourers. And while the subjects are employed in collecting, and manufacturing (if I may so say) their various materials, the regina is engaged in carrying on the great, first principle of nature—the propagation of her species.
    • 1910, Olive M. Briggs, The Fir and the Palm, New York, N.Y.: Charles Scribner’s Sons, pages 94 and 287:
      Chiri says: “Pouf, child! That is not because she is grand. The Regina Margherita is grander, and she bows and smiles a dozen ways all at once. It is the heart.” Chiri says that—but if it is only the heart, she herself would make a very grand lady because her heart is of gold; and her smile is better than the regina’s, although some of her teeth are quite gone, and her skin is dark like the castagnola. [] [] But it has the bicyclists attending!” / “That is true. Then it must belong to the Queen Margherita!” / “It is not the regina’s coachman!” / “Parbleu, you are right! Then it may be the foreign prince who is visiting!”
    • 1977, The Spectator, page 28, column 3:
      He is, in any case, extremist enough to have decided to assassinate the Queen, out of frustration with his ‘token life, token education, token job, token family.’ He impresses Percy with his proposal to restore the ‘Ancient Kingdom of Northumbria’ and persuades him to help with the ‘reginicide.’ But the regina changes her route []
    • 2006, Vanessa Brooks, Queen’s English, London: Josef Weinberger Plays, →ISBN, pages 63 and 75:
      George No. Don’t ring the … / (Ruby rings the bell several times.) / Ruby Thank you. The Regina is rapidly approaching./ [] / Ruby AND SMILE – A TRIUMPHANT REGINA IS LANDING ON THE LAWN. / George WILL YOU STOP SAYING THAT. We don’t talk about reginas. / Ruby So it’s David. / George Her Majesty is not a … not in the vernacular. It’s official. For coins …

Anagrams edit

Interlingua edit

Noun edit

regina (plural reginas)

  1. queen

Italian edit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology edit

From Latin rēgīna; compare Spanish reina.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /reˈd͡ʒi.na/
  • Rhymes: -ina
  • Hyphenation: re‧gì‧na
  • (file)

Noun edit

regina f (plural regine, masculine re)

  1. queen (monarch)
  2. queen (male homosexual)
  3. (chess, card games) queen

Related terms edit

See also edit

Chess pieces in Italian · pezzi degli scacchi (layout · text)
           
re regina,
donna
torre alfiere cavallo pedone
Playing cards in Italian · carte da gioco (layout · text)
             
asso due tre quattro cinque sei sette
             
otto nove dieci fante donna,
regina
re jolly, joker,
matta

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

 
Gisela dē Bavāriā, Rēgīna Hungariae (Giselle of Bavaria, Queen of Hungary)

Etymology edit

From Proto-Italic *rēgīnā, see there for more. A feminine counterpart to rēx, rēgis (king).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

rēgīna f (genitive rēgīnae); first declension

  1. queen
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Fasti 6.37-38:
      ‘cūr igitur rēgīna vocor prīncepsque deārum?
      aurea cūr dextrae scēptra dedēre meae?’
      “Therefore, why am I being called queen and foremost of the goddesses? Why have they given me a golden scepter for my right hand?”
  2. princess
  3. (Later Latin, chess) queen

Declension edit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative rēgīna rēgīnae
Genitive rēgīnae rēgīnārum
Dative rēgīnae rēgīnīs
Accusative rēgīnam rēgīnās
Ablative rēgīnā rēgīnīs
Vocative rēgīna rēgīnae

Coordinate terms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

See also edit

Chess pieces in Latin · latrunculī, mīlitēs scaccōrum (layout · text)
           
rēx rēgīna turris sagittifer eques pedes

Further reading edit

  • regina”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • regina”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • regina in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • regina in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • regina”, in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • regina”, in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Alternative forms edit

  • R (abbreviation)

Etymology edit

From Latin regina.

Noun edit

regina f (definite singular reginaa, indefinite plural reginaer, definite plural reginaene)

  1. queen
    Synonym: dronning
    Coordinate term: rex

References edit

Anagrams edit

Old Norse edit

Noun edit

regina

  1. accusative singular definite of regi f

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

regina f

  1. definite nominative/accusative singular of regină