English edit

 
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Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Latin , ablative of rēs (thing, matter, topic).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɹiː/, /ɹeɪ/
    • (file)
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iː, -eɪ

Preposition edit

re

  1. About, regarding, with reference to; especially in letters, documents, emails and case law.
    Synonyms: about, apropos, as for; see also Thesaurus:about
    Re A (conjoined twins) [2000] EWCA Civ 254
Usage notes edit

This word, when used in this particular sense, is often rendered as Re: (with a colon and a capital R). It is not an abbreviation. Its capitalization in sentence-initial position (such as in subject lines) is often reanalyzed as being intrinsic, leading to intrasentence capitalization. Because email software introduces it to the subject line in email replies, it often conveys an added meaning of reply in the 21st century, in addition to the earlier aspect of regarding.

Related terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

The first syllable of Latin resonāre (to resound), the first word of the second line of the medieval hymn Ut queant laxis, from which the solfège syllables were taken because its successive lines started each on the next note of the scale. Doublet of resound and resonate.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

re (uncountable)

  1. (music) A syllable used in solfège to represent the second note of a major scale.
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

From re-

Noun edit

re (plural res)

  1. (video games, slang) Clipping of rematch.
    gg [good game], no re
  2. (marketing, branding) Clipping of reinsurance. (used in the branding of reinsurance company names)

Anagrams edit

Ainu edit

Ainu cardinal numbers
 <  2 3 4  > 
    Cardinal : re
    Ordinal : re ikinne

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

re (Kana spelling )

  1. three

Albanian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Albanian *rina, a noun derived from the Proto-Indo-European verb *h₃rinéHti whence Albanian rij (to make humid), from the root *h₃reyH- (move, flow, boil). It is likely morphologically identical with Illyrian ῥινός (rhinós, mist).[1] Further related to Sanskrit रिणाति (riṇā́ti, to make flow, to release, to pour) and Proto-Slavic *rinǫti (push, shove).[2]

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

 f (plural , definite réja, definite plural rétë)

  1. cloud
    qiell pa recloudless sky
  2. (less literally)
    re tymiplume of smoke
    re pluhuricloud of dust
    një re mushkonjasha swarm of mosquitos
    një re zogjsha flock of birds
  3. (figurative) cloud, gloom, bad luck (clarification of this definition is needed)
Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Katičić, Radoslav (1976) Ancient Languages of the Balkans, page 171
  2. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998) “re ~ rê”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 366

Further reading edit

  • re”, in FGJSH: Fjalor i gjuhës shqipe [Dictionary of the Albanian language] (in Albanian), 2006

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Albanian *raida, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂rey- (reason, count). Cognate with Latin rātiō (reason, judgment), Old Norse ráða, English read.

Noun edit

re f (plural re, definite reja)

  1. attention, care, consideration
Related terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

re f sg

  1. feminine of ri (young, new)
    një vajzë e rea young girl
    Djata e reThe New Testament

Noun edit

re f (plural reja, definite reja)

  1. young girl
    Synonyms: vajzë, voce
  2. daughter-in-law
    Synonym: nuse

Etymology 4 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

re

  1. second-person singular simple perfect indicative of bie

Asturian edit

Noun edit

re m (plural res)

  1. Alternative form of rei
  2. (music) re, ray

Breton edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Celtic *ɸro- (compare Welsh rhy, Irish ró-).

Adverb edit

re

  1. too much

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

re

  1. those

Etymology 3 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

re m (plural reo)

  1. pair (of shoes, eyes, etc.)
  2. couple

Catalan edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Latin rēm (thing, accusative), res coming from the nominative. Compare French rien.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

re

  1. (colloquial) Alternative form of res

Etymology 2 edit

Compare English re.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

re m (plural res)

  1. (music) re (second note of diatonic scale)

Chuukese edit

Pronoun edit

re

  1. they
    Synonym: ra
  2. they are
    Synonym: ra
  3. Of a nationality or place; -ish.

Czech edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

re n (indeclinable)

  1. (card games) double raise (multiplies the current stake by 4)

Noun edit

re n (indeclinable)

  1. (music) re

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

re f (plural re's, diminutive re'tje n)

  1. (Netherlands, music) re (second note of a major scale)
  2. (Belgium, music) d (tone)

Anagrams edit

Eastern Arrernte edit

Pronoun edit

re

  1. he (third person singular masculine pronoun)

References edit

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin rēx, rēgem. Compare Italian re.

Noun edit

re m (plural rês)

  1. king

Related terms edit

Galician edit

Noun edit

re m (plural res)

  1. (music) re (musical note)
  2. (music) D (the musical note or key)

See also edit

Ido edit

Etymology edit

From r +‎ -e.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

re (plural re-i)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter R/r.

See also edit

Interlingua edit

Preposition edit

re

  1. about

Italian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Latin rēx, via the nominative singular, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs (ruler, king). Doublet of rege, which was borrowed from Latin via the accusative rēgem.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈre/*, /ˈre/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Hyphenation:

Noun edit

re m (invariable, feminine regina)

  1. king (male monarch)
    Synonyms: (obsolete, poetic) rege, sovrano
    Hypernyms: monarca, regnante
  2. (chess, card games) king
  3. (figurative) king, magnate (man who excels in something)
    Synonyms: campione, principe, signore
Descendants edit
  • Maltese: re
See also edit
See also edit
Chess pieces in Italian · pezzi degli scacchi (layout · text)
           
re regina,
donna
torre alfiere cavallo pedone
Playing cards in Italian · carte da gioco (layout · text)
             
asso due tre quattro cinque sei sette
             
otto nove dieci fante donna,
regina
re jolly, joker,
matta

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin resonāre (to resound), from the first word of the second line of Ut queant laxis, the medieval hymn on which solfège was based, because its lines started on each note of the scale successively.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɛ/, /ˈrɛ/*
  • Rhymes:
  • Hyphenation:

Noun edit

re m (invariable)

  1. re (musical note)
  2. D (musical note or key)

Further reading edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

re

  1. The hiragana syllable (re) or the katakana syllable (re) in Hepburn romanization.

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

  1. ablative singular of rēs
  2. in reality, in fact, on practice (often strengthened by vērā, ipsā)

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • "re", in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • "re", in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • re in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Latvian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Through 17th century Italian. The first syllable of Latin resonāre (to resound), the first word of the second line of the medieval hymn Ut queant laxis, from which the solfège syllables were taken because its successive lines started each on the next note of the scale.

Noun edit

re m (invariable)

  1. (music) re, D (second note in the major scale)

Etymology 2 edit

Unclear.

Interjection edit

re

  1. look! see? (used to draw the listener's attention to something visible)
    re, tās ir mājas, kur piedzimulook, that is the house where I was born
    re, kā ceriņi saglaudušies ap mājām un žogiemlook how the lilacs have become smooth around the houses and fences
    re, cik klusu un nemanot mana māmuļa sirmolook how quietly, without being noticed, my mom became older (literally, “grayer)”)
  2. look, here is..., you see (used to draw the listener's attention to, or to emphasize, something said or written)
    malkas virtuvē nav; tad re, kāpēc māte vakar nekurinājathere is no wood in the kitchen; here is why mother did not start the heating yesterday
    re, Mārtiņ, kā iet mūsu dzīvītesee, Martin, how our little life is going?...
    bet strazds, re, dzied par Ēģipti pie būra tavā priedēbut the sterling, see, he is singing about Egypt at the cage in your pine tree
Synonyms edit

Ligurian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin rēx, via the nominative singular. Compare Italian re.

Noun edit

re m (please provide plural)

  1. king (type of monarch who rules a kingdom)

Maltese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Sicilian re and/or Italian re, from Latin rēx.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

re m (plural rejiet, feminine reġina)

  1. king
    Synonym: (see there for notes) sultan
  2. (chess) king

Related terms edit

See also edit

Chess pieces in Maltese · bċejjeċ taċ-ċess (layout · text)
           
re reġina torri isqof żiemel pjun, pedina, petun

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

re

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Manx edit

Alternative forms edit

Particle edit

re

  1. dependent form (after dy, nagh) of she
    Heill mee dy re Manninagh oo.I thought you were a Manxman.
    Ta mee credjal dy re ayns y gharey hooar ad eh.I think it was in the garden that they found it.

Northern Kurdish edit

Postposition edit

re

  1. a postposed element of several circumpositions

Derived terms edit

Northern Sotho edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *-tɪ̀ (say, quote).

Verb edit

re

  1. to say

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse reiða. Doublet of rede.

Alternative forms edit

Verb edit

re (present tense rer, past tense redde, past participle redd)

  1. to prepare; make (a bed)

Etymology 2 edit

From Italian.

Noun edit

re m (definite singular re-en, indefinite plural re-er, definite plural re-ene)

  1. re, the second syllable in the scale of solfège

References edit

Anagrams edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

Through 17th century Italian. The first syllable of Latin resonāre (to resound), the first word of the second line of the medieval hymn Ut queant laxis, from which the solfège syllables were taken because its successive lines started each on the next note of the scale.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

re m (definite singular re-en, indefinite plural re-ar, definite plural re-ane)

  1. (music) re a syllable used in solfège to represent the second note of a major scale.

References edit

Anagrams edit

Old Irish edit

Preposition edit

re

  1. Alternative spelling of (before)

Pali edit

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

re

  1. locative singular of ra (the Pali letter 'r')

Pennsylvania German edit

Etymology edit

Compare German einer.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

re

  1. dative feminine singular of en: a, an

Declension edit

Declension of en
masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative en en en
dative emme
me
re emme
me
accusative en en en

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French or Italian re.

Noun edit

re m (plural re)

  1. re (musical note)

Declension edit

Sardinian edit

Noun edit

re m (plural res)

  1. king
    Coordinate term: reina
  2. (chess) king

See also edit

Chess pieces in Sardinian · petzos de is iscacos (layout · text)
           
re reina turre alfiere caddu peone

Further reading edit

Serui-Laut edit

Noun edit

re

  1. eye

Sotho edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *-tɪ̀ (say, quote).

Verb edit

re

  1. to say

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈre/ [ˈre]
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Syllabification: re

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

re m (plural res)

  1. (music) re

Etymology 2 edit

Originally a prefix, re-.

Adverb edit

re

  1. very
    Synonym: muy
    es re tardeit's very late

Further reading edit

Turkish edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

re

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter R/r.
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Arabic رَاء (rāʔ).

Noun edit

re

  1. Letter of the Arabic alphabet: ر

Venetian edit

 
Re Artù.

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin rēx, via the nominative singular, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs (ruler, king). Doublet of rege, which was borrowed from Latin via the accusative rēgem.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

re m (plural re)

  1. king
    El re el goerna co saviesa.
    The king rules with wisdom.

Wandamen edit

Noun edit

re

  1. eye

Yoruba edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (intransitive) to go
    Synonyms: lọ,
    Àwòdì t'ó ń re Ìbarà, ẹ̀fúùfùú ta a nídìí pá; ó ní 'iṣẹ́ kúkú yá'
    The hawk which is going to Ibara, the wind pushes it suddenly, it responds quickly that that is the next best thing
    (proverb on expediency)
Usage notes edit
  • re when followed by direct object.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (intransitive, Ekiti) to be
    Synonym: jẹ́
    Ọmọ mẹ́tàdínlógún ní mo I am seventeen years old

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (intransitive, Ijebu) to be
    Synonym: jẹ́
    Ìjẹ̀bú "ré" m waWe are Ijebu.
    Ọmọ Ìjẹ̀bú "ré" iye miMy mother is Ijebu.

Etymology 4 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (transitive or intransitive or ergative) to roast
    Synonym:
Usage notes edit
  • re when followed by direct object.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 5 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (transitive) to nurse, to give specific attention to something or someone
    Synonym: tọ́jú
Usage notes edit
  • re when followed by direct object.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 6 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (transitive) to soak, to become swollen (usually in reference to the skin)
    Synonyms: ,
    ara ọmọ náàá lọ́wọ́ọ nínàThe child's body became swollen from the beating
Derived terms edit

Etymology 7 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (transitive) to exceed (in degree or dimension), to pass, to go across a mark
Derived terms edit

Etymology 8 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (transitive) to skim the top of a liquid
  2. To alter something, to cause something to be transferred or removed via supernatural or authoritative means
    Ifá ikú lórí awoIfa removed(premature) death from the head of the Ifa priest
Derived terms edit

Etymology 9 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (transitive) to put a curse or spell on someone
Usage notes edit
  • Always preceded by gbé
Derived terms edit

Etymology 10 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (intransitive) to trigger, to undergo a hit
    Pàkúté The trap triggered off
  2. (medicine) to dislocate, to suffer from a dislocated body part
    Synonyms: wọ́n, hán
    Ẹ̀yìn aboyún The pregnant woman dislocated her back
Derived terms edit

Etymology 11 edit

From re used in solfège to represent the second note of a major scale.

Alternative forms edit

  • (abbreviated): R, r

Noun edit

re

  1. The syllable used to represent the mid-tone
See also edit
names for tones