TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

al

  1. (metrology) Symbol for the attoliter (attolitre), an SI unit of fluid measure equal to 10−18 liters (litres).

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Hindi आल (āl)

NounEdit

al (usually uncountable, plural als)

  1. The Indian mulberry, Morinda citrifolia, especially as used to make dye.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • al” in The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
  • al” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  • "al" in WordNet 2.0, Princeton University, 2003.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch al.

AdverbEdit

al

  1. already

AdjectiveEdit

al (attributive alle, not comparable)

  1. all; every

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a contraction of the preposition a (to) + masculine singular article el (the).

ContractionEdit

al m

  1. to the

BretonEdit

ArticleEdit

al

  1. the

See alsoEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse allr (all).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

al (neuter alt, plural alle)

  1. all
  2. any

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *al, from Proto-Germanic *allaz.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

al

  1. all, all of
    al het bier
    all the beer
    Van Gogh produceerde al zijn werk gedurende een periode van slechts tien jaar.
    Van Gogh produced all of his work during a period of only ten years.
    Alle olie is uit de tanker gelekt.
    All the oil has leaked out of the tanker.
    Niet alle mensen zijn zo gemeen.
    Not all people are that mean.

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

al

  1. already
    Het is al negen uur. — It's 9 o'clock already.
  2. yet
    Heb je al een kip gekocht? — Have you bought a chicken yet?

Derived termsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

al

  1. even
    Al zou ik het willen... — Even if I wanted to...

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

al

  1. to; toward
    Li estas sur sia unua pilgrimo al Mekko.
    He is on his first pilgrimage to Mecca
    Islamanoj preĝas antaŭantaj al Mekko plurfoje ĉiutage.
    Muslims pray facing toward Mecca several times every day.
  2. to; indicates indirect object
    Ŝi donis la libron al siaj gepatroj.
    She gave the book to her (own) parents.

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

Contraction of ale, from French aller.

VerbEdit

al

  1. To go

SynonymsEdit


IdoEdit

AbbreviationEdit

al

  1. a la (≡ to the)

InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

al

  1. Contraction of a le (to the).

IstriotEdit

ContractionEdit

al

  1. Contraction of a (at) + el (the)
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 40:
      Che mai pioûn biela duon i’iê veisto al mondo,
      That I haven’t ever seen a more beautiful woman in the world,

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

  • prep a + article il

ContractionEdit

al

  1. at the, to the (+ a masculine noun in singular)

AnagramsEdit


KurdishEdit

NounEdit

al m

  1. side

NounEdit

al f

  1. flag, banner

SynonymsEdit

  • (side): alî, la
  • (flag): ala

LadinEdit

ContractionEdit

al

  1. at or to the (+ a masculine singular noun)

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German alt, from Proto-Germanic *aldaz. Cognate with German alt, English old, Dutch oud, West Frisian âld.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

al (masculine alen, feminine al, neuter aalt)

  1. old, aged
  2. (of food) stale

AntonymsEdit


MandinkaEdit

PronounEdit

al

  1. you (personal pronoun)

See alsoEdit


Mauritian CreoleEdit

VerbEdit

al

  1. Medial form of ale

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch al, from Proto-Germanic *allaz.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

al

  1. all, all of

AdverbEdit

al

  1. completely

ConjunctionEdit

al

  1. even though, no matter whether

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: al

Middle EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

al

  1. all (entirely, completely)

DeterminerEdit

al

  1. all
    • 1407, The Testimony of William Thorpe, pages 40–41
      And I seide, “Ser, in his tyme maister Ioon Wiclef was holden of ful many men the grettis clerk that thei knewen lyuynge vpon erthe. And therwith he was named, as I gesse worthili, a passing reuli man and an innocent in al his lyuynge. And herfore grete men of kunnynge and other also drowen myche to him, and comownede ofte with him. And thei sauouriden so his loore that thei wroten it bisili and enforsiden hem to rulen hem theraftir… Maister Ion Aston taughte and wroot acordingli and ful bisili, where and whanne and to whom he myghte, and he vsid it himsilf, I gesse, right perfyghtli vnto his lyues eende. Also Filip of Repintoun whilis he was a chanoun of Leycetre, Nycol Herforde, dane Geffrey of Pikeringe, monke of Biland and a maistir dyuynyte, and Ioon Purueye, and manye other whiche weren holden rightwise men and prudent, taughten and wroten bisili this forseide lore of Wiclef, and conformeden hem therto. And with alle these men I was ofte homli and I comownede with hem long tyme and fele, and so bifore alle othir men I chees wilfulli to be enformed bi hem and of hem, and speciali of Wiclef himsilf, as of the moost vertuous and goodlich wise man that I herde of owhere either knew. And herfore of Wicleef speciali and of these men I toke the lore whiche I haue taughte and purpose to lyue aftir, if God wole, to my lyues ende.”

NovialEdit

ContractionEdit

al

  1. contraction of a + li

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *allaz (grown-up).

AdjectiveEdit

al

  1. all

DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: al

Old EnglishEdit

NounEdit

āl n

  1. fire

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

ContractionEdit

al

  1. contraction of a + le (to the)

Old High GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *allaz.

AdjectiveEdit

al

  1. all
  2. every, each
  3. whole
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle High German: al

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *ēlaz, whence also Old English ǣl, Old Norse áll.

NounEdit

āl m

  1. eel
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer

Old SaxonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *allaz.

AdjectiveEdit

al

  1. all
DeclensionEdit


Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *ēlaz. Cognate with Old English ǣl, Dutch aal, Old High German āl (German Aal), Old Norse áll (Danish and Swedish ål).

NounEdit

āl m

  1. eel

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin illum, from ille.

ArticleEdit

al (masculine/neuter singular possessive article)

  1. of
    el este un prieten al meu — he is a friend of mine.

Related termsEdit

  • a (feminine singular)
  • ai (masculine plural)
  • ale (feminine/neuter plural)

See alsoEdit


Saterland FrisianEdit

AdverbEdit

al

  1. already

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

al m

  1. (contraction of a el) at the, to the.

ConjunctionEdit

al

  1. (in front of the infinitive of a verb) as soon as, when, upon.

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse, compare Icelandic elri.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

al c

  1. alder (tree)

DeclensionEdit


TurkishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Turkic āl (“red”), from Proto-Turkic *āl, *Āl (red, scarlet). Related to alev and almak.

AdjectiveEdit

al (comparative daha al, superlative en al)

  1. red
SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

al (definite accusative alı, plural allar)

  1. red
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Turkic *Āl.

NounEdit

al

  1. (dated) trick, trap

Etymology 3Edit

See almak.

VerbEdit

al

  1. second-person imperative of almak

VerbEdit

al

  1. second-person negative imperative of almamak
AntonymsEdit

VenetianEdit

PrepositionEdit

al

  1. to the
  2. at the

ArticleEdit

al m sg

  1. the

VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from German and English all.

AdjectiveEdit

al

  1. each
  2. every

WatubelaEdit

NounEdit

al

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary

West FrisianEdit

AdverbEdit

al

  1. already

DeterminerEdit

al

  1. all
Last modified on 6 April 2014, at 11:00