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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare French jubilaire.

AdjectiveEdit

jubilar (comparative more jubilar, superlative most jubilar)

  1. pertaining to, or having the character of, a jubilee
    • Bishop Joseph Hall
      [] the example of those ancient Roman Christians, as Eusebius and Sozomen report, would have taught us, that the tenth complete year of our Constantine deserves to be solemn and Jubilar.

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin iūbilāre, present active infinitive of iūbilō.

VerbEdit

jubilar (first-person singular present jubilo, past participle jubilat)

  1. (transitive, reflexive) to retire (to withdraw from work)

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin iūbilāre, present active infinitive of iūbilō.

VerbEdit

jubilar (first-person singular present indicative jubilo, past participle jubilado)

  1. (intransitive) to jubilate; to rejoice (to be very cheerful)
  2. (intransitive) to be expelled from university due to failing too many terms

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin iūbilāre, present active infinitive of iūbilō. Cognate with English jubilate.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /xubiˈlaɾ/, [xuβiˈlaɾ]

VerbEdit

jubilar (first-person singular present jubilo, first-person singular preterite jubilé, past participle jubilado)

  1. to retire
  2. (colloquial) to get rid of

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit