judicial

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin iūdiciālis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dʒuˈdɪʃəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪʃəl
  • Hyphenation: ju‧di‧cial

AdjectiveEdit

judicial (comparative more judicial, superlative most judicial)

  1. Of or relating to the administration of justice.
  2. Of or relating to the court system or the judicial branch of government.
    • 2013 August 10, “Can China clean up fast enough?”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
      It has jailed environmental activists and is planning to limit the power of judicial oversight by handing a state-approved body a monopoly over bringing environmental lawsuits.
  3. (Ireland, historical) specified by a civil bill court under the terms of the Land Law (Ireland) Act, 1881
    judicial rent, judicial lease
  4. Of or relating to judgeship or the judiciary, the collective body of judges.
  5. Of or relating to sound judgment; judicious (but see Usage notes).

SynonymsEdit

Usage notesEdit

Many editors would maintain the differentiation between judicial and judicious and thus would advise that writers should not confuse judicial (having to do with justice and judiciary systems) with judicious (showing good judgment). In adhering to this prescription, a phrase such as judicious use of X (wisely chosen use of X) is not interchangeable with judicial use of X (use of X by the courts). Descriptively, judicial is polysemic, with one of its senses meaning judicious, but the purpose of the prescription is to avoid having some readers sense awkwardness or apparent catachresis in the poorly chosen (albeit descriptively not wrong) usage; the editorial idea is that regardless of correctness or incorrectness, it is preferable to use the better/clearer word instead and thus avoid any chance of reader annoyance or reader confusion/missense. Meanwhile, the word juridical is not well differentiated in meaning from judicial, the two having substantial semantic overlap.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

judicial (uncountable)

  1. That branch of government which is responsible for maintaining the courts of law and for the administration of justice.
    Synonym: judiciary

TranslationsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin iūdiciālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

judicial (masculine and feminine plural judicials)

  1. judicial

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin iūdiciālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

judicial m or f (plural judiciais, comparable)

  1. judicial

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:judicial.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin iūdiciālis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /xudiˈθjal/, [xu.ð̞iˈθjal]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /xudiˈsjal/, [xu.ð̞iˈsjal]

AdjectiveEdit

judicial (plural judiciales)

  1. judicial

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit