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See also: Lamia, lamía, làmia, lâmia, and łamią

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lamia, from Ancient Greek Λάμια (Lámia).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lamia (plural lamias or lamiae)

  1. (Greek mythology) A monster preying upon human beings and who sucked the blood of children, often described as having the head and breasts of a woman and the lower half of a serpent.
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, partition III, section 2, member 1, subsection i:
      Apollonius [] by some probable conjectures, found her out to be a serpent, a lamia, and that all her furniture was like Tantalus' gold described by Homer, no substance, but mere illusions.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

lami +‎ -a

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: la‧mi‧a

AdjectiveEdit

lamia

  1. exclamatory form of lami


AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

 
Old Galician cart wheels
 
A Galician cart in exposition

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin lamia, from Ancient Greek Λάμια (Lámia).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lamia f (plural lamias)

  1. lamia (a monster preying upon human beings and who sucked the blood of children, often described as having the head and breasts of a woman and the lower half of a serpent)
  2. dusky shark (Carcharhinus obscurus)

Etymology 2Edit

Attested from 1371. From Old Galician, undocumented in Old Portuguese proper; from Latin lāmina (plate).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lamia f (plural lamias)

  1. iron rim or tyre of a cart's wheel
    Synonyms: canterla, ferra, palmela
  2. plate
    • 1371, A. López Ferreiro (ed.), Fueros municipales de Santiago y de su tierra. Madrid: Ediciones Castilla, page 434:
      Demays lançaron lámeas trauesas grandes de ferro enna porta do dito thesouro con clauos que passauan da outra parte, en tal maneyra, que os enssarraron enno dito thesouro; et en todo aquel dia non les leixaron dar nen auer pan, nen vino, nen outra vianda nihua
      And also they nailed large crossed iron plates on that treasury's door, with nails that pierced through the door, so that they were shut up in the mentioned treasury; and throughout that day they didn't let them have bread, nor wine, nor any other viand whatsoever
    Synonym: lámina

ReferencesEdit

  • lámea” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • lamia” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • lamia” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • lamia” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Rivas Quintas, Eligio (2015). Dicionario etimolóxico da lingua galega. Santiago de Compostela: Tórculo. →ISBN, s.v. lamia.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Λάμια (Lámia).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lamia f (genitive lamiae); first declension

  1. witch who was said to suck children's blood (sort of female bogeyman)
  2. a sorceress, enchantress, witch
  3. sort of flatfish
  4. species of owl

DeclensionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative lamia lamiae
Genitive lamiae lamiārum
Dative lamiae lamiīs
Accusative lamiam lamiās
Ablative lamiā lamiīs
Vocative lamia lamiae

Usage notesEdit

  • Elsewhere used to refer to a type of flatfish and a type of owl.

ReferencesEdit

  • lamia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lamia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lamia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • lamia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • lamia in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • lamia in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lamia in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • lamia in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly