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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Irish leipreachán, luprachán, from Middle Irish luchrupán, from Old Irish luchorpán, from (small, from Proto-Indo-European *legwh) + corp (body, which is from Latin corpus). See also Irish lucharachán.

PronunciationEdit

 
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NounEdit

leprechaun (plural leprechauns)

  1. (Irish folklore) One of a race of elves that can reveal hidden treasure to those who catch them.
    • 1888, William Butler Yeats, Irish Fairy and Folk Tales:
      Do you not catch the tiny clamour,
      Busy click of an elfin hammer,
      Voice of the leprechaun singing shrill,
      As he merrily plies his trade?

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English leprechaun, from Irish leipreachán, luprachán, from Middle Irish luchrupán, from Old Irish luchorpán, from (small, from Proto-Indo-European *legwh) + corp (body, which is from Latin corpus and cognate with corpo).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛ.pre.kon/, /ˈlɛ.pri.kon/

NounEdit

leprechaun m (invariable)

  1. (Irish folklore) leprechaun
    Synonyms: gnomo irlandese, folletto irlandese

Derived termsEdit