leprechaun

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Irish leipreachán, luprachán, from Middle Irish luchrupán, from Old Irish luchorpán. See also Irish lucharachán.

The word's further etymology is disputed; it is traditionally explained as a compound containing (small, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁lengʷʰ-) + corp (body, which is from Latin corpus).[1] However, an alternative suggestion is that it is a derivative of Latin Lupercī (priests of Lupercus), who were misinterpreted as an antediluvian species by medieval Irish scholars.[2]

PronunciationEdit

 
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NounEdit

leprechaun (plural leprechauns)

  1. (Irish folklore) One of a race of elves that can reveal hidden treasure to those who catch them.
    • 1888, William Butler Yeats, Irish Fairy and Folk Tales:
      Do you not catch the tiny clamour,
      Busy click of an elfin hammer,
      Voice of the leprechaun singing shrill,
      As he merrily plies his trade?

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ leprechaun, n.”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1902.
  2. ^ Jacopo Bisagni (2012), “Leprechaun: A New Etymology”, in Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies, volume 64, pages 46-84

ItalianEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English leprechaun, from Irish leipreachán, luprachán, from Middle Irish luchrupán, from Old Irish luchorpán, of disputed etymology.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛ.pre.kon/, /ˈlɛ.pri.kon/

NounEdit

leprechaun m (invariable)

  1. (Irish folklore) leprechaun
    Synonyms: gnomo irlandese, folletto irlandese

Derived termsEdit