See also: Lintel

EnglishEdit

 
Lintel labeled with 2 (sill is number 1)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English lyntel, from Old French lintel, from Vulgar Latin *līntellus, for *līmitellus, diminutive noun from līmes.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lintel (plural lintels)

  1. (architecture) A horizontal structural beam spanning an opening, such as between the uprights of a door or a window, and which supports the wall above.
    • 1915, W.S. Maugham, "Of Human Bondage":
      Athelny had told him that he lived in a house built by Inigo Jones; he had raved, as he raved over everything, over the balustrade of old oak; and when he came down to open the door for Philip he made him at once admire the elegant carving of the lintel.

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GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French lintel, from Vulgar Latin limitalis, from Latin liminaris.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lintel m (plural linteis)

  1. lintel
    Synonym: lumieira

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ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

lintel m (oblique plural linteaus or linteax or lintiaus or lintiax or lintels, nominative singular linteaus or linteax or lintiaus or lintiax or lintels, nominative plural lintel)

  1. lintel (beam)

DescendantsEdit

  • French: linteau
  • Middle English: lintel
  • Portuguese: lintel, dintel
  • Spanish: lintel, dintel

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lintel m (plural lintéis)

  1. lintel

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SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /linˈtel/, [lĩn̪ˈt̪el]

NounEdit

lintel m (plural linteles)

  1. (architecture) lintel

Further readingEdit