EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English jambe, from Middle French jambe (leg), from Late Latin gamba. Doublet of gamba, gamb, and gam.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jamb (plural jambs)

  1. (architecture, interior decorating, carpentry) Either of the vertical components that form the side of an opening in a wall, such as that of a door frame, window frame, or fireplace.
  2. (mining) Any thick mass of rock that prevents miners from following the lode or vein.
  3. Synonym of jambeau (piece of armor for the leg).
    • 1842, S.R. Meyrick, A Critical Inquiry Into Antient Armour, as it Existed in Europe, Particularly in Great Britain, from the Norman Conquest to the Reign of King Charles II: Ill. by a Series of Illuminated Engravings : with a Glossary of Military Terms of the Middle Ages, page 51:
      Wyntoun, in his Chronicle, mentions an encounter betwixt Lindsay and a Highlander, whom he had pierced with his lance, but who, while on the ground, cut at him with his twohanded sword, and, striking through his steel jambs  []
    • 1889, Frank Cowper, The Captain of the Wight: A Romance of Carisbrooke Castle in 1488, page 257:
      The light of the moon gleamed on his steel helmet, his globular corslet, and the taces cuisses, or thigh pieces, and steel jambs which protected his legs.
    • 1907, Surrey Archaeological Society, Surrey Archaeological Collections: Relating to the History and Antiquities of the County, page 42:
      The arms are additionally protected by plate armour - arrière bras with epaules or roundels at the shoulders, and similar [] The steel poleyns below this are large and fully formed, and below them are steel jambs, or greaves ...
    • 1980, Wolfram Eschenbach, Parzival, Penguin UK (→ISBN)
      Each was wearing a surcoat either of brocade or samite. They were still wearing their steel jambs, but their other armour had been removed from them. There can be no more sleeping. The King and Queen rose, a priest sang Mass.

Alternative formsEdit

HypernymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

jamb (third-person singular simple present jambs, present participle jambing, simple past and past participle jambed)

  1. (transitive) To fix or attach a jamb to.

EstonianEdit

 
Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jamb (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. (poetry) iamb

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Further readingEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /jamp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -amp
  • Syllabification: jamb

NounEdit

jamb m inan

  1. (poetry) iamb

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • jamb in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • jamb in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jȁmb m (Cyrillic spelling ја̏мб)

  1. iamb

DeclensionEdit