See also: Modius

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin modius, from modus (a measure) + -ius (forming adjectives). Doublet of muid.

NounEdit

modius (plural modii)

  1. (Ancient Rome, historical units of measure) A Roman dry measure of about a peck or 9 L.
  2. (historical units of measure) Various medieval units of dry and liquid volume.
  3. (religion, art) A bushel-shaped headdress worn by certain deities in classical art.

ReferencesEdit

  • "modius, n.", in the Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

 
4th century Roman modius

EtymologyEdit

From modus (a measure) + -ius.

NounEdit

modius m (genitive modiī or modī); second declension

  1. (historical units of measure) modius, a unit of dry measure (especially for grain) of about a peck or 9 L

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative modius modiī
Genitive modiī
modī1
modiōrum
Dative modiō modiīs
Accusative modium modiōs
Ablative modiō modiīs
Vocative modie modiī

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

MeronymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • modius in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • modius in Charlton T. Lewis, An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1891
  • modius in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • modius in Gaffiot, Félix, Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, 1934
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden, Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co., 1894
    • corn had gone up to 50 denarii the bushel: ad denarios L in singulos modios annona pervenerat
  • modius in Harry Thurston Peck, editor, Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1898
  • modius in William Smith, editor, A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray, 1848
  • modius in William Smith et al., editor, A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin, 1890