English edit

Etymology edit

From French moi.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /mwɑː/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑː

Pronoun edit

moi

  1. (humorous or sarcastic, often used questioningly to express mock surprise) Me.
    Don't you be so cheeky. — Cheeky? Moi?
    Who'd have thought that such a thing would happen to little old moi!
    • 2000 April 30, John Swartzwelder, “Kill the Alligator and Run”, in The Simpsons, season 11, episode 19:
      Kid Rock: Yo, let's waste that biotch. / Homer: Biotch? Moi?
    • 2011, Jason Segel, Nicholas Stoller, The Muppets, spoken by Miss Piggy:
      There's only one Miss Piggy, and she is moi.

Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Abinomn edit

Noun edit

moi

  1. land snake
  2. paternal grandfather

Cimbrian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German mīn, form Old High German mīn, from Proto-West Germanic *mīn, from Proto-Germanic *mīnaz (my, mine). Cognate with German mein, English mine.

Determiner edit

moi

  1. (Luserna) my
    Moi pruadar Sèpp hatt 9 djar.My brother Joe is nine years old.

References edit

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

From Low German; see German Low German moin. Has also been compared with moro, suggesting a connection with Swedish morgon, but this is now considered unlikely.[1]

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmoi̯/, [ˈmo̞i̯]
  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes: -oi
  • Syllabification(key): moi

Interjection edit

moi

  1. hi, hello

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Santeri Junttila, historical linguist at the University of Helsinki, via Yle (October 2023)

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French moy, from Old French mei, moi, mi (me), tonic form of me, from Latin (me), from Proto-Indo-European *(h₁)me-, *(h₁)me-n- (me). More at me.

See cognates in regional languages in France: Norman mei; Gallo mai; Picard moè; Bourguignon moi; Franco-Provençal ; Occitan and Corsican me.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

moi

  1. me (first-person singular direct object pronoun)
  2. to me (first-person singular indirect object pronoun)

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Noun edit

moi m (uncountable)

  1. ego

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Galician edit

Etymology edit

13th century. From Old Galician-Portuguese moi, mui, from moito, muito (very) (moi is exclusively used by Galician authors and in the Cantigas de Santa Maria).

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

moi

  1. Apocopic form of moito (very)

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  • mui” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • moi” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • moi” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • moi” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

moi

  1. Rōmaji transcription of もい

Mòcheno edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German meie, from Old High German meio, from Latin Maius. Cognate with German Mai.

Noun edit

moi m

  1. May

See also edit

References edit

Murui Huitoto edit

moi
Root Classifier
moi-

Etymology edit

Cognates include Minica Huitoto moi and Nüpode Huitoto moi.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmɔi]
  • Hyphenation: moi

Noun edit

moi

  1. rear

Declension edit

Root edit

moi

  1. rear

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Shirley Burtch (1983) Diccionario Huitoto Murui (Tomo I) (Linguistica Peruana No. 20)‎[2] (in Spanish), Yarinacocha, Peru: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, page 178
  • Katarzyna Izabela Wojtylak (2017) A grammar of Murui (Bue): a Witotoan language of Northwest Amazonia.[3], Townsville: James Cook University press (PhD thesis), page 127

Naga Pidgin edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Assamese মই (moi), from Early Assamese মঞি (moñi), মই (moi), Kamarupi Prakrit 𑖦𑖂 (mai, by me), 𑖦𑖺𑖊 (moe), from Magadhi Prakrit 𑀫𑀇 (maï, by me), 𑀫𑀏 (mae), from Sanskrit मया (máyā, by me), from Proto-Indo-Aryan *máyaH, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *máyaH, the instrumental singular of *aȷ́ʰám (I), from Proto-Indo-European *éǵHom.

Pronoun edit

moi

  1. I (1st person singular pronoun)
    Synonym: ami

Nefamese edit

Etymology edit

inherited from Assamese মই (moi).

Pronoun edit

moi

  1. I (1st person singular pronoun)

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

  • mei (early Old French or Anglo-Norman)
  • mi (early Old French)

Etymology edit

Tonic form of me, from Latin .

Pronoun edit

moi

  1. me

Usage notes edit

  • Similar in terms of usage to modern French moi except it may be used as a personal object pronoun where modern French would use me :
    ele se paine de moi ocire (modern French uses me tuer or m’occire).

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Middle French: moy

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

moi

  1. virile nominative/vocative plural of mój

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

moi

  1. first/second-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of muia

Sranan Tongo edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Dutch mooi.

Adjective edit

moi

  1. beautiful

Vietnamese edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Vietic *-mɔːl ~ muəl (digging stick), from Proto-Mon-Khmer *ɟmuul ~ *ɟmuəl (to dibble); cognate with Bahnar jơmul (to plant rice using dibble stick to make holes) and Khmu [Cuang] cmɔːl ("to plant"). Compare mói (as in soi mói, from Proto-Vietic *c-mɔːlʔ).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

moi (𫴱)

  1. to drag out, to dig out

Derived terms edit

Derived terms

Noun edit

(classifier con) moi

  1. a kind of sea shrimp