See also: of, OF, Of-, OF., óf, òf, and ôf

IcelandicEdit

PrefixEdit

of-

  1. too much, excessively, hyper-

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *aba- (away, away from), from Proto-Indo-European *apo- (off, away). Cognate with Old Saxon af-, Old Norse af-, Gothic 𐌰𐍆- (af-), English off-; and with Latin ab-, Ancient Greek ἀπο- (apo-).

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

of-

  1. off, away from

Derived termsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *aba- (away, away from), from Proto-Indo-European *apo- (off, away). Cognate with Old Saxon af-, Old Norse af-, Gothic 𐌰𐍆- (af-), Old High German ab; and with Latin ab-, Ancient Greek ἀπο- (apo-).

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

of-

  1. off, away, from, out of, away from
    ofgānto exact
    ofmunanto call to mind
    ofġiefanto give up, surrender
  2. down
    ofdælea descent, decline
  3. excessively, negatively
    ofēhtanto persecute
    ofdrincanto intoxicate
  4. for, for the purpose of
    ofclipianto call for, request

Usage notesEdit

  • of- is the unstressed form of the stressed prefix æf-.

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: of-

Derived termsEdit