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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From off- +‎ shore.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

offshore (not comparable)

  1. Moving away from the shore.
  2. Located in the sea away from the coast.
    an offshore oil rig
  3. Located in another country, especially one having beneficial tax laws.

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

offshore (not comparable)

  1. Away from the shore.
  2. At some distance from the shore.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

offshore (third-person singular simple present offshores, present participle offshoring, simple past and past participle offshored)

  1. To use foreign labor to substitute for local labor.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

offshore (plural offshores)

  1. An area or or portion of sea away from the shore.
    • 1884, Report of the Commissioner of Fisheries to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, Washington: United States Bureau of Fisheries, page XXVI:
      This problem, so far as the offshores of the United States is concerned, is one that is eminently worthy of the attention of the United States Fish Commission and the support of Congress in its attempt to solve it.
  2. An island, outcrop, or other land away from shore.
    • 1958 October 11, “Signs of improvement”, in Business Week, page 36:
      The Nationalists see that they have nothing to gain—in fact, a lot to lose—by hanging onto the offshores as military bases.
  3. Something or someone in, from, or associated with another country.
    • 1984, Richard H. Blum, Offshore Haven Banks, Trusts, and Companies, New York: Praeger, →ISBN, page 31:
      If costs are unequally imposed by governments on their offshores, the government makes the U.S. banking industry less competitive.
    • 2001, Cindy Hahamovitch, “In America Life is Given Away”, in Catherine McNicol Stock and Robert D. Johnston, editors, The Countryside in the Age of the Modern State, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, →ISBN, page 136:
      Though American legislators renewed restrictive immigration policies in the two decades after the war, they allowed employers of farmworkers to import some 4.5 million Mexican "braceros" and Caribbean "offshores," as the workers were called.

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English offshore.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

offshore (plural offshores)

  1. offshore, in the sea away from the coast
  2. offshore, in another country

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English

AdjectiveEdit

offshore (indeclinable)

  1. offshore

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English

AdjectiveEdit

offshore (indeclinable)

  1. offshore

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

offshore (invariable)

  1. offshore

NounEdit

offshore f (plural offshores)

  1. offshore, offshore company