Last modified on 18 March 2015, at 12:51

orle

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French (also modern) orle, from ourler ‘to hem’, or from *orula, a diminutive of Latin ora ‘edge’, probably from os, or- ‘mouth’.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

orle (plural orles)

  1. (heraldry) A bordure which runs around the outline of a shield without touching the edge.
    • 1819: In his hand he bore that singular “abacus”, or staff of office, with which Templars are usually represented, having at the upper end a round plate, on which was engraved the cross of the Order, inscribed within a circle or orle, as heralds term it. — Walter Scott, Ivanhoe
  2. (heraldry) The wreath, or chaplet, surmounting or encircling the helmet of a knight and bearing the crest.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From *orula, a diminutive of Latin ora ‘edge’, probably from os, or- ‘mouth’.

NounEdit

orle m (plural orles)

  1. (heraldry) orle

External linksEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

orle

  1. locative singular of orzeł
  2. vocative singular of orzeł

AdjectiveEdit

orle

  1. neuter nominative singular of orli
  2. neuter accusative singular of orli
  3. neuter vocative singular of orli
  4. other nominative plural of orli
  5. other accusative plural of orli
  6. other vocative plural of orli

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

orle

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of orlar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of orlar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of orlar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of orlar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

orle

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of orlar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of orlar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of orlar.