wreath

EnglishEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

EtymologyEdit

See writhe.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

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Wikipedia

wreath (plural wreaths)

  1. Something twisted, intertwined, or curled.
    a wreath of smoke;  a wreath of clouds
    • 1892, James Yoxall, chapter 5, The Lonely Pyramid:
      The desert storm was riding in its strength; the travellers lay beneath the mastery of the fell simoom. Whirling wreaths and columns of burning wind, rushed around and over them.
  2. An ornamental circular band made e.g. of plaited flowers and leaves, and used as decoration; a garland; a chaplet, especially one given to a victor.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 12, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      So, after a spell, he decided to make the best of it and shoved us into the front parlor. 'Twas a dismal sort of place, with hair wreaths, and wax fruit, and tin lambrekins, and land knows what all.
  3. (heraldry) An appendage to the shield, placed above it, and supporting the crest. It generally represents a twist of two cords of silk, one tinctured like the principal metal, the other like the principal color in the coat of arms.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

wreath (third-person singular simple present wreaths, present participle wreathing, simple past and past participle wreathed)

  1. To place an entwined circle of flowers upon or around something.
  2. To wrap around something in a circle.
    At the funeral, a circle of comrades wreath the grave of the honored deceased.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 18:45