EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English filet, vylette, felet, filette, flette, from Old French filet, diminutive of fil (thread), from Latin fīlum (thread).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fillet (plural fillets)

  1. (now rare) A headband; a ribbon or other band used to tie the hair up, or keep a headdress in place, or for decoration.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book 1, canto 3:
      In secret shadow, farre from all mens sight:
      From her faire head her fillet she undight,
      And laid her stole aside.
    • 1713, Alexander Pope, “Windsor-Forest. []”, in The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope, volume I, London: [] W[illiam] Bowyer, for Bernard Lintot, [], published 1717, OCLC 43265629:
      A fillet binds her hair.
    • 1842, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Lady Anne Granard, volume 1, page 252:
      "Know thy own worth, and reverence the lyre," is a line that should be as a fillet bound round the brow—a philactory embroidered on the garments of every son and daughter of Adam distinguished by the possession of that sacred gift, which, whether used or abused, applauded in itself or derided in its possessor, is the highest and the most inalienable distinction humanity ever has or ever can be gifted with, whether bestowed on the highest or the humblest being, in the great mass to which we all belong.
    • 1970, John Glassco, Memoirs of Montparnasse, Mew York 2007, p. 42:
      She was talking of Raymond Duncan, a walking absurdity who dressed in an ancient handwoven Greek costume and wore his hair in long braids reaching to his waist, adding, on ceremonial occasions, a fillet of bay-leaves.
  2. A thin strip of any material, in various technical uses.
  3. (construction) A heavy bead of waterproofing compound or sealant material generally installed at the point where vertical and horizontal surfaces meet.
  4. (engineering, drafting, CAD) A rounded relief or cut at an edge, especially an inside edge, added for a finished appearance and to break sharp edges.
  5. A strip or compact piece of meat or fish from which any bones and skin and feathers have been removed.
  6. (UK) A premium cut of meat, especially beef, taken from below the lower back of the animal, considered to be lean and tender; also called tenderloin.
    fillet steak
  7. (architecture) A thin featureless moulding/molding used as separation between broader decorative mouldings.
  8. (architecture) The space between two flutings in a shaft.
  9. (heraldry) An ordinary equal in breadth to one quarter of the chief, to the lowest portion of which it corresponds in position.
  10. The thread of a screw.
  11. A colored or gilded border.
    • 1911, George Sterling, The Swimmers[1]:
      Fairer than gods and naked as the moon, The foamy fillets at their ankles strewn Less marble-white than they
  12. The raised moulding around the muzzle of a gun.
  13. (woodworking) Any scantling smaller than a batten.
  14. (anatomy) A fascia; a band of fibres; applied especially to certain bands of white matter in the brain.
  15. The loins of a horse, beginning at the place where the hinder part of the saddle rests.

SynonymsEdit

  • (a boneless cut of meat): filet

AntonymsEdit

  • (rounded outside edge): round

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

VerbEdit

fillet (third-person singular simple present fillets, present participle filleting, simple past and past participle filleted)

  1. (transitive) To slice, bone or make into fillets.
  2. (transitive) To apply, create, or specify a rounded or filled corner to.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

fill +‎ -et

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fillet m (plural fillets, feminine filleta)

  1. (Menorca) boy
    Synonym: nen

Further readingEdit