See also: Ora, óra, orá, orà, oră, öra, and ора

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

ora

  1. plural of os; mouths or openings, especially of the cervix.

Etymology 2Edit

Old English [Term?].

NounEdit

ora (plural oras)

  1. A unit of money among the Anglo-Saxons.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ora f

  1. definite singular of orë

AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

ora f (plural oras)

  1. hour

ReferencesEdit


AzerbaijaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Turkish ora.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdverbEdit

ora

  1. there, thither, to that place
    Ora getmə.Don't go there.

Derived termsEdit

  • ora-bura (hither and thither)
  • orada (there)
  • oraya (thither, to that place)
  • oradan (thence, from that place)

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

ora

  1. that place

DeclensionEdit


BlagarEdit

NounEdit

ora

  1. tail

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin aura (breeze). Doublet of aura.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ora f (plural ores)

  1. breeze
  2. calm weather
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ora

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of orar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of orar

Further readingEdit


CorsicanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hōra.

NounEdit

ora f (plural ori)

  1. hour
  2. time

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From oro (gold) +‎ -a (adjectival suffix).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ora (accusative singular oran, plural oraj, accusative plural orajn)

  1. golden

Related termsEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *ora, from Proto-Finno-Ugric *ora, borrowed from Proto-Indo-Iranian *Hā́raH (compare Sanskrit आरा (ā́rā)), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ólos (compare Old Norse alr, English awl). Cognate with Hungarian ár, Inari Sami oari, Moksha ура (ura).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈorɑ/, [ˈo̞rɑ]
  • Rhymes: -orɑ
  • Syllabification: o‧ra

NounEdit

ora

  1. thorn

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of ora (Kotus type 10/koira, no gradation)
nominative ora orat
genitive oran orien
partitive oraa oria
illative oraan oriin
singular plural
nominative ora orat
accusative nom. ora orat
gen. oran
genitive oran orien
orainrare
partitive oraa oria
inessive orassa orissa
elative orasta orista
illative oraan oriin
adessive oralla orilla
ablative oralta orilta
allative oralle orille
essive orana orina
translative oraksi oriksi
instructive orin
abessive oratta oritta
comitative orineen
Possessive forms of ora (type koira)
possessor singular plural
1st person orani oramme
2nd person orasi oranne
3rd person oransa

SynonymsEdit

CompoundsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

ora

  1. third-person singular present indicative of orar
  2. second-person singular imperative of orar

InterlinguaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian ora

AdverbEdit

ora

  1. now
    Synonym: nunc

ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin hōra (hour), from ὥρα (hṓra, hour).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈo.ra/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ó‧ra

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ora f (plural ore)

  1. hour
  2. time (of day); hour
    che ora è?what time is it?
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin hōrā, ablative case of hōra (hour).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ora

  1. now
    Synonym: adesso
Derived termsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ora

  1. and yet

ConjunctionEdit

ora... ora...

  1. first... then...; one moment... the next..
    ora mi ama ora mi odia
    one moment she loves me, the next she hates me

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin aura, from αὔρα (aúra, breeze, soft wind). Doublet of the borrowing aura.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ora f (plural ore)

  1. (poetic, regional) blow, breeze
    Synonyms: aura, brezza, venticello

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ora

  1. inflection of orare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

AnagramsEdit


JavaneseEdit

Javanese register set
ꦏꦿꦩ (krama): boten
ꦔꦺꦴꦏꦺꦴ (ngoko): ora

EtymologyEdit

From *wola, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wada. Compare Aklanon waea'.

AdverbEdit

ora

  1. not

ParticleEdit

ora

  1. no

KapingamarangiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Oceanic [Term?], from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wada.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

VerbEdit

ora

  1. To live.

LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hōra.

NounEdit

ora f (plural ores)

  1. hour

SynonymsEdit

PrepositionEdit

ora

  1. except

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown; possibly related to Hittite [script needed] (er-ḫa-aš /erḫaš/, line, boundary), Sanskrit आरे (āré, far), perhaps all from Proto-Indo-European *h₁erh₂- (border, line).[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ōra f (genitive ōrae); first declension

  1. border, rim, frontier, limit, edge
  2. sea coast
  3. region, country
DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ōra ōrae
Genitive ōrae ōrārum
Dative ōrae ōrīs
Accusative ōram ōrās
Ablative ōrā ōrīs
Vocative ōra ōrae
SynonymsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Asturian: oriella, oliancu
  • Catalan: vora
  • French: orle
  • Galician: orela

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of ōs (mouth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ōra

  1. nominative plural of ōs
  2. accusative plural of ōs
  3. vocative plural of ōs

Etymology 3Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ōrā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of ōrō

ReferencesEdit

  • ora in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ora in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ora in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • ora in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to hug the coast: oram legere (Liv. 21. 51)
    • to land (of ships): appelli (ad oram) (Att. 13. 21)
    • (ambiguous) to draw every one's eyes upon one: omnium oculos (et ora) ad se convertere
    • (ambiguous) to be in every one's mouth: per omnium ora ferri
    • (ambiguous) to be a subject for gossip: in ora vulgi abire
    • (ambiguous) the storm drives some one on an unknown coast: procella (tempestas) aliquem ex alto ad ignotas terras (oras) defert
  • ora in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ora in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  1. ^ Kloekhorst, Alwin (2008) Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 5), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page erḫ- / araḫ- / arḫ-, erḫa-, arḫa- of 245-247
  2. ^ Mallory, J. P.; Adams, D. Q. (2006) The Oxford introduction to Proto-Indo-European and the Proto-Indo-European world, Oxford University Press, page 288

MaoriEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *ola, from Proto-Oceanic, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wada (to exist).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ora

  1. to exist
  2. to be alive, well, safe, cured, recovered, healthy
  3. to survive

NounEdit

ora

  1. life
  2. existence

NiasEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *haʀəzan.

NounEdit

ora

  1. ladder
  2. stairs

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ora f sg

  1. definite feminine singular of or

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ora f sg

  1. definite feminine singular of or

OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hōra (hour).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ora f (plural oras)

  1. hour (period of 60 minutes)
  2. time (of day), hour
    Quina ora es?
    What time is it?

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the voiced Verner alternant of Proto-Germanic *ausô, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ows-.

NounEdit

ōra n

  1. ear

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • ōra”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A derivate of ear (earth)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ōra m

  1. ore, unwrought metal; brass
  2. border, bank, shore

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the voiced Verner alternant of Proto-Germanic *ausô, whence also Old English ēare and English ear, Old Norse eyra (ear), Old Dutch ōra (ear), Old Saxon ōra (ear). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ows-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ōra n

  1. ear (organ of hearing)

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle High German: ore

ReferencesEdit

  1. Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer, Second Edition

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *auʀā, from Proto-Germanic *ausô, whence also Old Frisian āre, Old English ēare and English ear, Old Norse eyra (ear), Old Dutch ōra (ear), Old High German ōra (ear). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ows-.

NounEdit

ōra n

  1. ear

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Low German: ôre
    • Low German: Ohr
      • Dutch Low Saxon: oor
      • German Low German: Or, Ur
        Plautdietsch: Oa, Ua

PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese hora and Spanish hora and Kabuverdianu óra.

NounEdit

ora

  1. time
  2. hour

PronounEdit

ora

  1. when

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ora

  1. (proscribed) third-person singular present of orać

Usage notesEdit

Standard form: orze


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔ.ɾɐ/, [ˈɔ.ɾɐ]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese ora, from Latin hōra (hour). Doublet of hora.

AdverbEdit

ora

  1. now
    Synonyms: agora,

ConjunctionEdit

ora … ora

  1. sometimessometimes
    Ora ele ri, ora chora.
    Sometimes he laughs, others he cries.

InterjectionEdit

ora!

  1. duh; obviously (expresses that something is obvious)
  2. oh no! (expresses frustration or irritation)

Derived termsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

ora

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of orar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of orar



Rapa NuiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *ola, from Proto-Oceanic [Term?], from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wada.

VerbEdit

ora

  1. live

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ora

  1. definite nominative/accusative singular of oră

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) aura

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aura.

NounEdit

ora f

  1. (Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) weather

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ora

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of orar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of orar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of orar.

ConjunctionEdit

ora ... ora ...

  1. now (something) now something else; sometimes something, sometimes something else; at times something, at times something else. Used to introduce opposing ideas.
    Tomando ora la espada, ora la pluma.
    Taking at times the sword, at times the pen.
    • 1877, Benito Pérez Galdós, Gloria
      Daba grandes tumbos a babor y estribor, mostrando ora la horrible panza, ora la cubierta en desorden, negra y húmeda, las escotillas, el cajón de la máquina []
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

ReferencesEdit

ora” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Further readingEdit


TahitianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *ola.

VerbEdit

ora

  1. live

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ottoman Turkish اورا‎, equivalent to o (that) +‎ -ra.

PronounEdit

ora

  1. there