See also: Lore, łore, lóre, and lòre

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lore, from Old English lār, from Proto-West Germanic *laiʀu, from Proto-Germanic *laizō, from *laizijaną (to teach). Cognate with Dutch leer, German Lehre and Danish lære. See also learn.

NounEdit

lore (countable and uncountable, plural lores)

  1. All the facts and traditions about a particular subject that have been accumulated over time through education or experience.
    the lore of the Ancient Egyptians
  2. The backstory created around a fictional universe.
    • 2018 March 6, Martin Robinson, “Dispelling the myths of Bloodborne”, in Eurogamer[1]:
      You might have stumbled upon discussions of Bloodborne's lore - there are plenty of discussions about Bloodborne's lore - which can be more than a little dense and, to the outsider, off-putting.
  3. (obsolete) Workmanship.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin lorum (thong, strap).

NounEdit

lore (plural lores)

  1. (anatomy) The region between the eyes and nostrils of birds, reptiles, and amphibians.
  2. (anatomy) The anterior portion of the cheeks of insects.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

lore

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense and past participle of lose
  2. (obsolete) simple past tense and past participle of lose, used in the sense of "left"
  3. (obsolete) simple past tense and past participle of lese

AnagramsEdit


BasqueEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin flos, florem.

NounEdit

lore inan

  1. flower

DeclensionEdit

Declension of lore (inanimate, ending in vowel)
indefinite singular plural
absolutive lore lorea loreak
ergative lorek loreak loreek
dative loreri loreari loreei
genitive loreren lorearen loreen
comitative lorerekin lorearekin loreekin
causative lorerengatik lorearengatik loreengatik
benefactive lorerentzat lorearentzat loreentzat
instrumental lorez loreaz loreez
inessive loretan lorean loreetan
locative loretako loreko loreetako
allative loretara lorera loreetara
terminative loretaraino loreraino loreetaraino
directive loretarantz lorerantz loreetarantz
destinative loretarako lorerako loreetarako
ablative loretatik loretik loreetatik
partitive lorerik
prolative loretzat

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From lor (at the time of, at the same time as) +‎ -e (adverb).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlo.re/, /ˈlɔ.ɾɛ/

AdverbEdit

lore

  1. (demonstrative adverb) then, at the time
    Ilu forsis la chefa pordo, iris trans la longa vestibulo e lore apertis la pordo dil koqueyo.
    He forced the main door, went through the long hall, and then opened the door of the kitchen.

Related termsEdit

  • lora (then, now)

See alsoEdit

  • ita (that (person))
  • ito (that (thing))
  • iti (that (plural))
  • pro ito (therefore)
  • ibe (there)
  • tala (such kind of)
  • tanta (so much)

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English lār, from Proto-West Germanic *laiʀu, from Proto-Germanic *laizō; the final vowel is generalised from the Old English oblique cases.

Compare Middle Low German lêre, lêr, Middle High German lēre, Middle Dutch lere, Old Frisian lāre.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔːr(ə)/
  • (Early ME, Northern ME) IPA(key): /ˈlɑːr(ə)/

NounEdit

lore (plural lores)

  1. education, tutoring, mentoring; learning; the absorption of knowledge
  2. lore, knowledge, information, especially:
    • 1407, The Testimony of William Thorpe, pages 40–41
      And thei sauouriden so his loore that thei wroten it bisili and enforsiden hem to rulen hem theraftir… …taughten and wroten bisili this forseide lore of Wiclef, and conformeden hem therto… And herfore of Wicleef speciali and of these men I toke the lore whiche I haue taughte and purpose to lyue aftir, if God wole, to my lyues ende.”
    1. (religion) religious beliefs, doctrine, orthodoxy
    2. area of study, subject, topic, science
    3. (rare) The foundations of a subject; the collected works on a topic.
  3. recommendation, suggestion, tip; admonition, exhortation, pleading
  4. A moral code; standards of conduct; a way of acting, standard.
  5. A demand, order, or task
  6. (rare) knowledge, aptitude, competence
  7. (rare) significance, value, importance
  8. (rare) tale, narrative
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: lore
  • Scots: lare, lair
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English lor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lore

  1. loss (losing something)
  2. loss (having soldiers killed in battle)
  3. ruin, destruction, injury.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

MooreEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English lorry, compare Farefare loore.

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /ló.ɾè/

NounEdit

lore (plural loaya)

  1. vehicle
  2. car, automobile

SynonymsEdit


TarantinoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lore m (possessive, plural)

  1. theirs