out of place

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

Prepositional phraseEdit

out of place

  1. (idiomatic) Not in the proper situation or arrangement, or inappropriate for the circumstances.
    • 2020 November 14, Phil McNulty, “England 0-0 Brazil”, in BBC News[1]:
      Rashford showed the fearless streak Southgate so admires with his constant willingness to run at Brazil's defence with pace, even demonstrating on occasion footwork that would not have been out of place from members of England's illustrious opposition.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 12, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      All this was extraordinarily distasteful to Churchill. [] Never before had he felt such repulsion when the vicar displayed his characteristic bluntness or coarseness of speech. In the present connexion—or rather as a transition from the subject that started their conversation—such talk had been distressingly out of place.
    She comes in out of the storm with not a hair out of place.
    Amongst all those horsey people I felt quite out of place.
    That remark was out of place.
    No wonder I couldn't find it - it was out of place.

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