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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From out- +‎ door.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

outdoor (not comparable)

  1. Situated in, designed to be used in, or carried on in the open air. [from 18th c.]
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess[1]:
      A very neat old woman, still in her good outdoor coat and best beehive hat, was sitting at a polished mahogany table on whose surface there were several scored scratches so deep that a triangular piece of the veneer had come cleanly away, […].
  2. Pertaining to charity administered or received away from, or independently from, a workhouse or other institution. [from 19th c.]
    • 1997, Roy Porter, The Greatest Benefit to Mankind, Folio Society 2016, p. 395:
      Believing social policy should be directed by experts to bring about the greatest happiness of the greatest number, Benthamites judged the old Poor Law outdoor relief system a recipe for waste and idleness.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

  outdoor on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English outdoor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

outdoor m (plural outdoors)

  1. billboard (very large advertisement along the side of a road)
    • 2006, Eduardo Peñuela Cañizal, “Cartazes e outdoors na poética da intempérie”, in Significação, volume 28, page 61:
      Tanto é assim que hoje, nas grandes cidades, os outdoors não somente são emoldurados, mas também protegidos para que o tempo não os deteriore.
      So much that today, in the big cities, billboards are not only framed, but also protected so that the weather doesn’t deriorate them.