outdoor

See also: Outdoor

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From out- +‎ door.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌaʊtˈdɔː/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)

AdjectiveEdit

outdoor (not comparable)

  1. Situated in, designed to be used in, or carried on in the open air. [from 18th c.]
    Synonyms: out-of-door, outside
    Antonyms: indoor, inside
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess[1]:
      A very neat old woman, still in her good outdoor coat and best beehive hat, was sitting at a polished mahogany table on whose surface there were several scored scratches so deep that a triangular piece of the veneer had come cleanly away, […].
  2. Pertaining to charity administered or received away from, or independently from, a workhouse or other institution. [from 19th c.]
    • 1997, Roy Porter, The Greatest Benefit to Mankind, Folio Society 2016, p. 395:
      Believing social policy should be directed by experts to bring about the greatest happiness of the greatest number, Benthamites judged the old Poor Law outdoor relief system a recipe for waste and idleness.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • German: Outdoor
  • Japanese: アウトドア (autodoa)
  • Portuguese: outdoor
  • Spanish: outdoor

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

outdoor (third-person singular simple present outdoors, present participle outdooring, simple past and past participle outdoored)

  1. (in some African communities) To publicly display a child after it has been named
    (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English outdoor.

PronunciationEdit

 
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˌaw.t͡ʃiˈdɔʁ/ [ˌaʊ̯.t͡ʃiˈdɔh], /ˌawt͡ʃˈdɔʁ/ [ˌaʊ̯t͡ʃˈdɔh]
    • (São Paulo) IPA(key): /ˌaw.t͡ʃiˈdɔɾ/ [ˌaʊ̯.t͡ʃiˈdɔɾ], /ˌawt͡ʃˈdɔɾ/ [ˌaʊ̯t͡ʃˈdɔɾ]
    • (Rio de Janeiro) IPA(key): /ˌaw.t͡ʃiˈdɔʁ/ [ˌaʊ̯.t͡ʃiˈdɔχ], /ˌawt͡ʃˈdɔʁ/ [ˌaʊ̯t͡ʃˈdɔχ]
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /ˌawt͡ʃˈdɔɻ/ [ˌaʊ̯t͡ʃˈdɔɻ], /ˌaw.t͡ʃiˈdɔɻ/ [ˌaʊ̯.t͡ʃiˈdɔɻ]

NounEdit

outdoor m (plural outdoors)

  1. (Brazil) billboard (very large advertisement along the side of a road)
    • 2006, Eduardo Peñuela Cañizal, “Cartazes e outdoors na poética da intempérie”, in Significação, volume 28, page 61:
      Tanto é assim que hoje, nas grandes cidades, os outdoors não somente são emoldurados, mas também protegidos para que o tempo não os deteriore.
      So much that today, in the big cities, billboards are not only framed, but also protected so that the weather doesn’t deriorate them.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English outdoor.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /audˈdoɾ/, [au̯ð̞ˈð̞oɾ]

AdjectiveEdit

outdoor (invariable)

  1. outdoor

Usage notesEdit

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.