plait

See also: plaît

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French pleit, from Latin plecto, which is akin to Old Norse flétta (Danish flette) and to Russian сплетать (spletatʹ).

NounEdit

plait (plural plaits)

  1. A flat fold; a doubling, as of cloth; a pleat.
    a box plait
    • Addison
      the plaits and foldings of the drapery
  2. A braid, as of hair or straw; a plat.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

plait (third-person singular simple present plaits, present participle plaiting, simple past and past participle plaited)

  1. (transitive) To fold; to double in narrow folds; to pleat; as, to plait a ruffle.
  2. (transitive) To interweave the strands or locks of; to braid; to plat; as, to plait hair; to plait rope.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      Her abundant hair, of a dark and glossy brown, was neatly plaited and coiled above an ivory column that rose straight from a pair of gently sloping shoulders, clearly outlined beneath the light muslin frock that covered them.

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

plait

  1. Alternative form of plaît.

Usage notesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French plait, plet.

NounEdit

plait (plural plaits)

  1. an argument or debate

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

plait m (oblique plural plaiz, nominative singular plaiz, nominative plural plait)

  1. agreement
  2. argument; dispute
  3. court (of law)
  4. plea; ask; demand

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 4 April 2014, at 19:08