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See also: Rath, ráth, rað, -raþ, and ráð

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Old Irish ráth.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rath (plural raths)

  1. (historical) A walled enclosure, especially in Ireland; a ringfort built sometime between the Iron Age and the Viking Age.
    • 1907, James Woods, Annals of Westmeath, Ancient and Modern:
      There are numerous Danish raths in the parish.
    • 1931, H. P. Lovecraft, The Whisperer in Darkness, chapter 1:
      Those with Celtic legendry in their heritage—mainly the Scotch-Irish element of New Hampshire, and their kindred who had settled in Vermont on Governor Wentworth’s colonial grants—linked them vaguely with the malign fairies and “little people” of the bogs and raths, and protected themselves with scraps of incantation handed down through many generations.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

rath (comparative more rath, superlative most rath)

  1. Alternative form of rathe.

AnagramsEdit


CornishEdit

NounEdit

rath f (plural rathes)

  1. rat

SynonymsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish rath (grace, virtue), from Proto-Celtic *ɸratom (grace, virtue, good fortune), from the root *ɸar- (bestow) (whence Old Irish ernaid, from Proto-Indo-European *perh₃- (bestow, give) (whence also Sanskrit पृणाति (pṛṇā́ti, grant, bestow), Latin parō (prepare)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rath m (genitive singular ratha)

  1. (literary) bestowal, grant; grace, favour; gift, bounty
  2. prosperity
  3. abundance
  4. usefulness, good

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Matasović, Ranko (2009), “far-na-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 122
  • Matasović, Ranko (2009), “frato-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 140
  • 1 rath” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • “raṫ” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 2nd ed., 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.
  • "rath" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • prosperity” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.
  • success” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *raþą (wheel), from Proto-Indo-European *rot- (wheel). Cognate with Old Frisian reth (wheel), Dutch rad (wheel), German Rad (wheel).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rath n

  1. wheel

DeclensionEdit