See also: Rath, ráth, rað, -raþ, and ráð

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

Borrowing from Old Irish ráth.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rath (plural raths)

  1. (historical) A walled enclosure, especially in Ireland; a ringfort built sometime between the Iron Age and the Viking Age.
    • 1907, James Woods, Annals of Westmeath, Ancient and Modern:
      There are numerous Danish raths in the parish.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

rath (comparative more rath, superlative most rath)

  1. Alternative form of rathe

AnagramsEdit


CornishEdit

NounEdit

rath f (plural rathes)

  1. rat

SynonymsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish rath (grace, virtue), from Proto-Celtic *ɸratom (grace, virtue, good fortune), from the root *ɸar- (bestow) (whence Old Irish ernaid, from Proto-Indo-European *perh₃- (bestow, give) (whence also Sanskrit पृणाति (pṛṇā́ti, grant, bestow), Latin parō (prepare)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rath m (genitive singular ratha)

  1. (literary) bestowal, grant; grace, favour; gift, bounty
  2. prosperity
  3. abundance
  4. usefulness, good

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Matasović, Ranko (2009), “far-na-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-17336-1, page 122
  • Matasović, Ranko (2009), “frato-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-17336-1, page 140
  • 1 rath” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • “raṫ” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.

External linksEdit

  • "rath" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • fortune” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.
  • prosperity” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.
  • success” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *raþą (wheel), from Proto-Indo-European *rot- (wheel). Cognate with Old Frisian reth (wheel), Dutch rad (wheel), German Rad (wheel).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rath n

  1. wheel

DeclensionEdit