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See also: Hart and hårt

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hert, from Old English heorot (stag), from Proto-Germanic *herutaz (compare Dutch hert, German Hirsch, Danish/Norwegian/Swedish hjort), from Pre-Germanic *kerudos, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóru (horn).

NounEdit

hart (plural harts)

  1. A male deer, especially the male of the red deer after his fifth year.
  2. A red deer or one of related species.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See heart.

NounEdit

hart (plural harts)

  1. Obsolete spelling of heart

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch hart, from Middle Dutch herte, harte, from Old Dutch herta, from Proto-Germanic *hertô, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr.

NounEdit

hart (plural harte)

  1. heart

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch herte, harte, from Old Dutch herta, from Proto-Germanic *hertô, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hart n (plural harten, diminutive hartje n)

  1. heart, main muscle pumping blood through the body:
  2. The center point or zone of an object, image etc.
  3. The core or essence of some thing, reasoning etc.
  4. Compassionate or similar feelings

Derived termsEdit


FaroeseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hart (neuter of harður)

  1. hard
  2. loud

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French hart, from Old French hart, hard, a borrowing from Frankish *harda, from Proto-Germanic *hezdǭ. Compare Middle Dutch herde, German Hardt.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hart f (plural harts)

  1. (archaic) cord, rope; halter (hangman's rope)

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German hart, from Proto-Germanic *harduz, from Proto-Indo-European *kert-, *kret- (strong; powerful). Cognate with Low German hard, hart, Dutch hard, English hard, Danish hård.

PronunciationEdit

  • (standard German) IPA(key): /haʁt/
  • (common, especially in northern and central Germany) IPA(key): /haːt/
  • (file)
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

hart (comparative härter, superlative am härtesten)

  1. hard
  2. severe, harsh
    • 2012 May 2, Die Welt [1], page 10:
      Die harten Einschnitte zum Schuldenabbau standen in vielen EU-Ländern im Zentrum der Kritik der Demonstranten.
      The severe cuts for the reduction of debt were in many EU countries at the center of criticism by the protesters.

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

hart

  1. hard
  2. sharply, roughly, severely
  3. close (an (+ dative) to)

Further readingEdit

  • hart in Duden online

IcelandicEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hart

  1. neuter nominative and accusative of harður

IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English heart.

NounEdit

hart m (genitive singular hairt, nominative plural hairt)

  1. (card games) heart
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Non-lemma forms.

NounEdit

hart

  1. h-prothesized form of art

ReferencesEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch hart, from Proto-Germanic *harduz.

AdjectiveEdit

hart

  1. hard (not soft)
  2. solid, sturdy
  3. hard, harsh, cruel

InflectionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • hart”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • hart (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

North FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian herte. Cognates include West Frisian hert.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hart n (plural harten)

  1. (Mooring and Föhr-Amrum dialects) heart
    At hart klopet/böget.
    My heart is beating.

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *harduz, whence also Old Saxon hard, Old English heard, Old Frisian herd, Old High German hart, Old Norse harðr. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kert-, *kret- (strong; powerful).

AdjectiveEdit

hart (comparative hardiro, superlative hardist)

  1. hard

DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *harduz, whence also Old Saxon hard, Old Dutch hart, Old English heard, Old Norse harðr, Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐍂𐌳𐌿𐍃 (hardus). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kert-, *kret- (strong; powerful).

AdjectiveEdit

hart

  1. hard

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hart m inan

  1. strength, resilience, fortitude

Usage notesEdit

On its own, used mainly in the idiom hart ducha. Most of the derived terms are technical and refer to steel hardening.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


West FrisianEdit

NounEdit

hart n (plural harten)

  1. deer