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See also: Grant

Contents

EnglishEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for grant in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English granten, graunten, grantien, grauntien, from Anglo-Norman granter, graunter, from Old French granter, graunter, graanter, greanter (to promise, assure, guarantee, confirm, ratify), from a merger of Old French garantir, guarantir ("to guarantee, assure, vouch for", see guarantee) and earlier cranter, craanter, creanter (to allow, permit), from an assumed Medieval Latin *credentāre, from Latin credere (to believe, trust). More at guarantee, credit.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

grant (third-person singular simple present grants, present participle granting, simple past and past participle granted)

  1. To give over; to make conveyance of; to give the possession or title of; to convey; -- usually in answer to petition.(Can we add an example for this sense?)
  2. To bestow or confer, with or without compensation, particularly in answer to prayer or request; to give.(Can we add an example for this sense?)
    • 1668 July 3, James Dalrymple, “Thomas Rue contra Andrew Houſtoun” in The Deciſions of the Lords of Council & Seſſion I (Edinburgh, 1683), page 548:
      He Suſpends on theſe Reaſons, that Thomas Rue had granted a general Diſcharge to Adam Muſhet, who was his Conjunct, and correus debendi, after the alleadged Service, which Diſcharged Muſhet, and conſequently Houstoun his Partner.
    • 2013 May 17, George Monbiot, “Money just makes the rich suffer”, in The Guardian Weekly[1], volume 188, number 23, page 19:
      In order to grant the rich these pleasures, the social contract is reconfigured. The welfare state is dismantled. […]
  3. To admit as true what is not yet satisfactorily proved; to yield belief to; to allow; to yield; to concede.
    • a. 1921, George Bernard Shaw, Back to Methuselah, Preface ("The Infidel Half Century"), section "In Quest of the First Cause":
      The universe exists, said the father: somebody must have made it. If that somebody exists, said I, somebody must have made him. I grant that for the sake of argument, said the Oratorian.
  4. To assent; to consent.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

grant (plural grants)

  1. The act of granting; a bestowing or conferring; concession; allowance; permission.
  2. The yielding or admission of something in dispute.
  3. The thing or property granted; a gift; a boon.
    I got a grant from the government to study archeology in Egypt.
  4. (law) A transfer of property by deed or writing; especially, an appropriation or conveyance made by the government
    a grant of land or of money
  5. the deed or writing by which such a transfer is made.
  6. (informal) An application for a grant (monetary boon to aid research or the like).

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

grant m

  1. grant (the thing or property granted; a gift; a boon)
    dotace a granty z evropských fondů
    požádat o a získat grant od grantové agentury

Derived termsEdit


Franco-ProvençalEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin grandis, grandem.

AdjectiveEdit

grant m (feminine singular grant or granta, masculine plural grants, feminine plural grants or grantes)

  1. big, large

Derived termsEdit


FriulianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • grand (alternative orthography)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin grandis, grandem.

AdjectiveEdit

grant

  1. big, large

Middle FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

grant m, f (plural grans)

  1. (early Middle French) Alternative form of grand

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin grandis, grandem.

AdjectiveEdit

grant m (oblique and nominative feminine singular grant or grande)

  1. big, large
    • circa 1150, Thomas d'Angleterre, Le Roman de Tristan, page 168 (of the Champion Classiques edition, ISBN 2-7453-0520-4, line 2021:
      plaint sa mesaise e sa grant peine
      she lamented her suffering and her great pain

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • grand (alternative spelling)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ɡɾãnt], [ɡɾãn]

AdjectiveEdit

grant m f (plural grandes)

  1. Apocopic form of grande; great; big; large.
    • c. 1200: Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 18r.
      Fue el dia ṫcero al alba dela man. ¬ vinẏerȯ truenos ¬ relȧpagos ¬ nuf grȧt ſobrel mȯt.
      On the morning of the third day there came thunder and flashes of lightning and a great cloud upon the mountain.

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

grant

  1. absolute indefinite neuter form of grann.