See also: Grant

English edit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for “grant”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1913, →OCLC.)

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English granten, graunten, grantien, grauntien, from Anglo-Norman granter, graunter, from Old French granter, graunter, graanter, greanter (to promise, assure, guarantee, confirm, ratify), from a merger of Old French garantir, guarantir (to guarantee, assure, vouch for) (see English guarantee) and earlier cranter, craanter, creanter (to allow, permit), from an assumed Medieval Latin *credentāre, from Latin credere (to believe, trust). More at guarantee, credit.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

grant (third-person singular simple present grants, present participle granting, simple past and past participle granted)

  1. (ditransitive) to give (permission or wish)
    He was granted permission to attend the meeting.
    The genie granted him three wishes
    Antonym: deny
  2. (ditransitive) To give (bestow upon or confer, particularly in answer to prayer or request)
    • 1668 July 3, James Dalrymple, “Thomas Rue contra Andrew Houſtoun” in The Deciſions of the Lords of Council & Seſſion I (Edinburgh, 1683), page 548:
      He Suſpends on theſe Reaſons, that Thomas Rue had granted a general Diſcharge to Adam Muſhet, who was his Conjunct, and correus debendi, after the alleadged Service, which Diſcharged Muſhet, and conſequently Houstoun his Partner.
    • c. 1930, Serenity Prayer
      God, grant me the serenity []
    • 2013 May 17, George Monbiot, “Money just makes the rich suffer”, in The Guardian Weekly[1], volume 188, number 23, page 19:
      In order to grant the rich these pleasures, the social contract is reconfigured. The welfare state is dismantled. […]
  3. (transitive) To agree with (someone) on (something); to accept (something) for the sake of argument; to admit to (someone) that (something) is true.
    Synonyms: concur, concede, allow
    • a. 1921, George Bernard Shaw, Back to Methuselah, Preface ("The Infidel Half Century"), section "In Quest of the First Cause":
      The universe exists, said the father: somebody must have made it. If that somebody exists, said I, somebody must have made him. I grant that for the sake of argument, said the Oratorian.
    • 1897, Marie Corelli, “Chapter I”, in Ziska: The Problem of a Wicked Soul, New York: Stone & Kimball, pages 23–24:
      "They are tall, certainly," said Sir Chetwynd... "I grant you they are tall. That is, the majority of them are. But I have seen short men among them. The Khedive is not taller than I am. And the Egyptian face is very deceptive. The features are often fine,—occasionally classic,—but intelligent expression is totally lacking."
  4. (intransitive) To assent; to consent.[1]

Translations edit

Noun edit

grant (plural grants)

  1. The act of granting or giving
    Synonyms: concession, allowance
    the grant of permission for a project
  2. The yielding or admission of something in dispute.[1]
  3. The thing or property granted; a gift; a boon.[1]
    I got a grant from the government to study archeology in Egypt.
  4. (law) A transfer of property by deed or writing; especially, an appropriation or conveyance made by the government.[1]
    a grant of land or of money
  5. The deed or writing by which such a transfer is made.[1]
  6. (informal) An application for a grant (monetary boon to aid research or the like).

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References edit

Anagrams edit

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

grant m inan

  1. grant (the thing or property granted; a gift; a boon)
    dotace a granty z evropských fondů(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    požádat o a získat grant od grantové agentury(please add an English translation of this usage example)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • grant in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • grant in Akademický slovník cizích slov, 1995, at prirucka.ujc.cas.cz

Franco-Provençal edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective edit

grant m (feminine singular grant or granta, masculine plural grants, feminine plural grants or grantes)

  1. big, large

Derived terms edit

Friulian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • grand (alternative orthography)

Etymology edit

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective edit

grant

  1. big, large

Middle French edit

Adjective edit

grant m or f (plural grans)

  1. (early Middle French) Alternative form of grand

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Adjective edit

grant

  1. neuter singular of grann

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective edit

grant m (oblique and nominative feminine singular grant or grande, comparative maior, superlative grandisme)

  1. big, large
    • c. 1150, Thomas d'Angleterre, Le Roman de Tristan, Champion Classiques edition, →ISBN, page 168, line 2021:
      plaint sa mesaise e sa grant peine
      she lamented her suffering and her great pain

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Middle French: grand
    • French: grand
    • Norman: grand
    • Picard: grand
    • English: grand

Old Spanish edit

Alternative forms edit

  • grand (alternative spelling)

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

grant m or f (plural grandes)

  1. Apocopic form of grande; great; big; large.
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 18r:
      Fue el dia t̃cero al alba dela man. ⁊ vinẏerõ truenos ⁊ relãpagos ⁊ nuf grȧt ſobrel mõt.
      On the morning of the third day there came thunder and flashes of lightning and a great cloud upon the mountain.

Descendants edit

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English grant.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

grant m inan (related adjective grantowy)

  1. (law) grant (fund given by a person or organisation, often a public body, charitable foundation, a specialised grant-making institution, or in some cases a business with a corporate social responsibility mission, to an individual or another entity, usually, a non-profit organisation, sometimes a business or a local government body, for a specific purpose linked to public benefit)
    Coordinate terms: dofinansowanie, dotacja, subsydium, subwencja
  2. research, artistic, or social project that is funded by a grant obtained through a competition

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

nouns

Further reading edit

  • grant in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • grant in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish edit

Adjective edit

grant

  1. indefinite neuter singular of grann