See also: Revere, révéré, and révère

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French révérer, ultimately from Latin revereor, from re- +‎ vereor (to fear).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

revere (third-person singular simple present reveres, present participle revering, simple past and past participle revered)

  1. (transitive) to regard someone or something with great awe or devotion.
  2. (transitive, also religion) to honour in a form lesser than worship, e.g. a saint, or an idol

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

revere (plural reveres)

  1. a revers

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English rēafere; equivalent to reven +‎ -er.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

revere (plural reveres)

  1. A robber or burglar; one who steals or thieves.
  2. A reaver or looter.
DescendantsEdit
  • English: reaver
  • Scots: refar (obsolete)
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Anglo-Norman rivere.

NounEdit

revere

  1. Alternative form of ryver