See also: Roch and roc'h

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

roch

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of riechen

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English rūh, from Proto-Germanic *rūhwaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

roch (plural rochs)

  1. land in an unimproved, virgin condition
  2. the major part of anything

AdjectiveEdit

roch (comparative mair roch, superlative maist roch)

  1. rough
  2. lewd, foul-mouthed, indecent, immoral
  3. abundant, bounteous, plentifully supplied, well-furnished (especially with good plain fare)
  4. (agriculture, etc., of the growth of grass or crops) strong, luxuriant, dense, luxuriant but of poor quality, rank
  5. (of a bone) having meat on it
  6. (agriculture, of sheep) unshorn, unclipped

AdverbEdit

roch (comparative mair roch, superlative maist roch)

  1. in a comfortable or well-supplied state

Derived termsEdit

  • rochian (ruffian, noun)
  • rochie (long wholemeal loaf of rough texture, noun)
  • rochle (rough, adj)
  • rochle (rough person, noun)
  • rochle (to toss about, agitate, shake roughly, tousle, verb)
  • rochness (roughness, abundance, plenty, noun)
  • rochsome (somewhat rough or uneven, rude, crude, uncouth, adj)
  • rocht (fitted with frost-nails, adj) (of a horse)
  • rochterie (rough people, riff-raff, noun)