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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French major.

Alternative formsEdit

  • Maj. (titular abbreviation)
  • maj. (nominal abbreviation)

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

major (plural majors)

  1. (military) A military rank between captain and lieutenant colonel.
    He used to be a major in the army.
Usage notesEdit
  • When used as a title, it is always capitalized.
  • In the US, the rank corresponds to pay grade O-4. Abbreviations: Maj. and MAJ.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English major, from Latin maior, comparative of magnus (great), from Proto-Indo-European *maǵ-yes- (greater), comparative of *maǵ-, *meǵ- (great). Compare West Frisian majoar (major), Dutch majoor (major). Doublet of mayor.

AdjectiveEdit

major (comparative more major, superlative most major)

  1. Of great significance or importance.
  2. Greater in number, quantity, or extent
    the major part of the assembly
  3. Of full legal age, having attained majority
  4. (music) Of a scale that follows the pattern: tone - tone - semitone - tone - tone - tone - semitone
    A major scale.
  5. (music) Being the larger of two intervals denoted by the same ordinal number.
  6. (music) Containing the note a major third (four half steps) above the tonic.
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

major (plural majors)

  1. (US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand) The main area of study of a student working toward a degree at a college or university.
    Midway through his second year of college, he still hadn't chosen a major.
  2. (US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand) A student at a college or university concentrating on a given area of study.
    She is a math major.
  3. A person of legal age.
  4. (logic) The major premise.
  5. (Canadian football) A touchdown, or major score.
  6. A large, commercially successful company, especially a record label that is bigger than an indie.
    • 1997, Billboard (volume 109, number 30, page 86)
      At the end of last year, the band re-signed to XL for another three albums, despite being chased by majors that included Island, says manager Mike Champion of Midi Management.
  7. (British slang, dated) An elder brother (especially at a public school).
  8. (zoology) A large leaf-cutter ant that acts as a soldier, defending the nest.
AntonymsEdit
  • (a person of legal age): minor
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

major (third-person singular simple present majors, present participle majoring, simple past and past participle majored)

  1. (intransitive) to concentrate on a particular area of study as a student in a college or university
    I have decided to major in mathematics.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin maior.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

major (masculine and feminine plural majors)

  1. larger (superlative: el major / la majorlargest)
  2. older (superlative: el major / la majoroldest)
  3. main, principal
  4. (music) major

NounEdit

major m (plural majors)

  1. (military) major

NounEdit

major m or f (plural majors)

  1. of age, adult

CzechEdit

NounEdit

major m

  1. major (military)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


EstonianEdit

 
Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Major, from Spanish, from Latin maior.

NounEdit

major (genitive majori, partitive majorit)

  1. major (rank)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Latin maior. French military authorities created in 1972 the rank of major (non-commissioned officer), which can easily be confused with the rank of major (officer) used in many countries, creating problems when communicating with allied forces. Doublet of maire and majeur.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

major m (plural majors)

  1. major, the upper rank of French non-commissioned officers

Further readingEdit


HungarianEdit

InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

major (not comparable)

  1. (comparative degree of grande) bigger

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

major (neuter majus, positive māgnus); third declension

  1. Alternative form of maior

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension comparative adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative major majus majōrēs majōra
Genitive majōris majōrum
Dative majōrī majōribus
Accusative majōrem majus majōrēs majōra
Ablative majōre majōribus
Vocative major majus majōrēs majōra

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

major m pers (abbreviation mjr)

  1. major (military rank)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • major in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

major m (plural majores)

  1. major (military rank)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Major, from Latin māior.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mǎjoːr/
  • Hyphenation: ma‧jor

NounEdit

màjōr m (Cyrillic spelling ма̀јо̄р)

  1. (military, Serbo-Croatian, Serbo-Croatian) major (rank)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

major c

  1. a major[1]
  2. a Squadron Leader[1] (in the British Royal Air Force)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of major 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative major majoren majorer majorerna
Genitive majors majorens majorers majorernas

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Utrikes namnbok (7th ed., 2007) →ISBN