See also: Rocker

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English rokker, rockere, rokkere, equivalent to rock +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɒkə(ɹ)/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒkə(ɹ)

NounEdit

rocker (plural rockers)

  1. A curved piece of wood attached to the bottom of a rocking chair or cradle that enables it to rock back and forth.
    • 1891, Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles, volume 1, London: James R. Osgood, McIlvaine and Co., page 30:
      The cradle-rockers had done hard duty for so many years, under the weight of so many children, on that flagstone floor, that they were worn nearly flat, in consequence of which a huge jerk accompanied each swing of the cot, flinging the baby from side to side like a weaver's shuttle, as Mrs Durbeyfield, excited by her song, trod the rocker with all the spring that was left in her after a long day's seething in the suds.
  2. A rocking chair.
  3. (surfing) The lengthwise curvature of a surfboard. (More rocker is a more curved board.)
    All modern surfboards share a similar rocker design — Bruce Jones [1]
  4. The breve below as in ḫ.
    • 1984, Stolper, Matthew Wolfgang, Texts from Tall-i Malyan Elamite Administrative Texts (1972–1974) (Occasional Publications of the Babylonian Fund; 6), University of Pennsylvania Press, →ISBN, page XVII:
      Like the editors of other Elamite texts, I omit the diacritic rocker from h in Elamite and from H in logograms in Elamite texts. I retain the rocker in and Ḫ in Sumerian and Akkadian.
    • 2011, van den Hout, Theo, The Elements of Hittite, Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 13:
      Although the exact sound value of s remains uncertain, and there is only one such sibiliant in Hittite, it is traditionally transliterated with a so-called haček: š. This should not be taken, however, as evidence that it was a palatal sound (as sh in show). The same is true for the traditional “rocker” under the laryngeal : there is no other h-sign, and the diacritic is not strictly necessary.
    • 2019, Huehnergard, John, “Proto-Semitic”, in Huehnergard, John and Na'ama Pat-El, editors, The Semitic Languages, 2nd edition, Routledge, →ISBN, page 15:
      Semitistic transliteration systems […] a number of features are common to most of them: […] ḫ (“h” with a “rocker,” conventionally called “hooked h”) for the voiceless velar/uvular fricative, IPA [x]/[χ], […]
  5. Someone passionate about rock music.
  6. A musician who plays rock music.
  7. (informal) A rock music song.
    • September 2010, Pitchfork Media, The Top 200 Tracks of the 1990s [2]
      "Girls & Boys" is [] also a tart, sneering rocker, full of ingenious musical gestures []
  8. One who rocks something.
    • 1645, Thomas Fuller, Good Thoughts in Bad Times:
      It was I, sir, said the rocker, who had the honour, some thirty years since, to attend on your highness in your infancy.
  9. (Britain) A member of a British subculture of the 1960s, opposed to the mods, who dressed in black leather and were interested in 1950s music.
  10. Any implement or machine working with a rocking motion, such as a trough mounted on rockers for separating gold dust from gravel, etc., by agitation in water.
  11. A tool with small teeth that roughens a metal plate to produce tonality in mezzotints.
  12. A rocking horse.
  13. A rocker board.
  14. A skate with a curved blade, somewhat resembling in shape the rocker of a cradle.
  15. A kind of electrical switch with a spring-loaded actuator.
  16. (engineering) A rock shaft.
  17. (military) A curved line accompanying the chevrons that denote rank, qualifying the rank with a grade.
    • 2000, Mark Collantes, The Academy (page 66)
      Cadet Sergeant First Class: 3 Chevrons and 2 rockers. Cadet Master Sergeant: 3 Chevrons and 3 rockers. Cadet First Sergeant: 3 Chevrons, 3 rockers with a diamond inset.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

rocker c (singular definite rockeren, plural indefinite rockere)

  1. An outlaw biker

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English rocker.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rocker m (plural rockers, diminutive rockertje n)

  1. A rocker (rock musician or rock fan).
  2. A rocker (rock song).

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

rock +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rocker

  1. to rock (play or enjoy rock music)

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English rocker.

NounEdit

rocker m (plural rockeri)

  1. rock music musician or fan

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From English rocker.

NounEdit

rocker m (plural rockeres)

  1. (rare) rocker (rock musician)