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See also: Mod, MOD, MoD, mód, mōd, möd, and mod.

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

Abbreviations.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mod (countable and uncountable, plural mods)

  1. (uncountable) An unconventionally modern style of fashionable dress originating in England in the 1960s, characterized by ankle-length black trenchcoats and sunglasses.
  2. (Britain) a 1960s British person who dressed in such a style and was interested in modernism and the modern music of the time; the opposite of a rocker.
  3. (video games) An end user-created package containing modifications to the look or behaviour of a video game.
  4. (Internet) A moderator, for example on a discussion forum.
  5. (computing, informal) A module (file containing a tracker music sequence).
    • 1992, "Jordan K. Hubbard", How to convert Amiga mods to Arch? (on Internet newsgroup comp.sys.acorn)
      I'd like to convert some of the arch[sic] mods back into Amiga mods since I don't have the original Amiga versions.
    • 2003, Rene T. A. Lysloff, Leslie C. Gay, Jr., Music and Technoculture (page 38)
      These mods, while usually having the distinctive bleep and beep quality of transistor-generated tones, are often astonishingly creative and rich in expressive nuances.
  6. (rock climbing) A moderately difficult route.
  7. (in the plural, Oxford University, informal) Moderations: university examinations generally taken in the first year.
  8. (mathematics, programming) Abbreviation of modulus.
    Synonyms: %, modulus
Usage notesEdit

In video gaming, mods are created by end users, whereas such content by the game creators would be called an expansion pack.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

mod (third-person singular simple present mods, present participle modding, simple past and past participle modded)

  1. (slang) To modify an object from its original condition, typically for the purposes of individualizing and/or enhancing the performance of the object.
    His friends were particularly impressed with the way he modded his Ruckus.
    Synonyms: trick, trick out
  2. To moderate; to silence or punish a rule-breaking user on a forum, especially when done by a moderator.
    Don't break the rules or you'll be modded.
Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mod (not comparable)

  1. Abbreviation of moderate.

Etymology 2Edit

You can help Wiktionary by providing a proper etymology.

NounEdit

mod (plural mods)

  1. A festival of Scottish Gaelic song, arts and culture, akin to the Welsh eisteddfod.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mod n (singular definite modet, not used in plural form)

  1. courage

SynonymsEdit

PrepositionEdit

mod

  1. against
  2. versus
  3. towards
  4. into
  5. from

SynonymsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

mod

  1. Alternative form of mode (intellect, mood, will, courage, nature)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

mod n (definite singular modet, uncountable)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by mot

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *mōdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *mē-, *mō-. Cognate with Old High German muot (German Mut), Old Saxon mōd, Old Dutch muot (Dutch (gee)moed), Old Norse móðr (anger, grief) (Swedish mod), Gothic 𐌼𐍉𐌸𐍃 (mōþs, anger, emotion). The Proto-Indo-European root was also the source of Ancient Greek μῶθαι (môthai) and Latin mōs.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mōd n

  1. mind
    • Adrian and Ritheus
      Mannes mōd biþ on þām hēafde and gǣþ ūt þurh þone mūþ.
      A person's mind is in the head and goes out through the mouth.
    • 9th century, Cynewulf, Juliana
      Hē ne meahte hiere mōd onċierran.
      He couldn't change her mind.
  2. courage, pride, grief, anger
  3. state of mind

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mode.

NounEdit

mod n (plural moduri)

  1. mode, fashion, style, way

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

You can help Wiktionary by providing a proper etymology.

NounEdit

mȏd m (Cyrillic spelling мо̑д)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

DeclensionEdit

This entry needs an inflection-table template.


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mod m (plural modes)

  1. mod

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse móðr, from Proto-Germanic *mōdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *mō-, *mē-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mod n

  1. courage
  2. feeling

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mod 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative mod modet
Genitive mods modets

AnagramsEdit


TurkishEdit

NounEdit

mod (definite accusative modu, plural modlar)

  1. mode
  2. mood

VepsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *mooto.

NounEdit

mod

  1. face

InflectionEdit

Inflection of mod
nominative sing. mod
genitive sing. modon
partitive sing. modod
partitive plur. modoid
singular plural
nominative mod modod
accusative modon modod
genitive modon modoiden
partitive modod modoid
essive-instructive modon modoin
translative modoks modoikš
inessive modos modoiš
elative modospäi modoišpäi
illative ? modoihe
adessive modol modoil
ablative modolpäi modoilpäi
allative modole modoile
abessive modota modoita
comitative modonke modoidenke
prolative mododme modoidme
approximative I modonno modoidenno
approximative II modonnoks modoidennoks
egressive modonnopäi modoidennopäi
terminative I ? modoihesai
terminative II modolesai modoilesai
terminative III modossai
additive I ? modoihepäi
additive II modolepäi modoilepäi

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007), “лицо”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mod

  1. Nasal mutation of bod.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bod fod mod unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.