See also: Romano, Romanò, and Romano-

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Italian romano (Roman). Doublet of Roman.

Noun edit

romano (countable and uncountable, plural romanos)

  1. a hard, sharp cheese served grated as a garnish

Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Esperanto edit

 
Esperanto Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eo

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [roˈmano]
  • Rhymes: -ano
  • Hyphenation: ro‧ma‧no

Etymology 1 edit

From French roman.

Noun edit

romano (accusative singular romanon, plural romanoj, accusative plural romanojn)

  1. novel
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Romo +‎ -ano.

Noun edit

romano (accusative singular romanon, plural romanoj, accusative plural romanojn)

  1. Roman (a native or inhabitant of Rome)

French edit

Noun edit

romano m (plural romanos)

  1. romano

Further reading edit

Galician edit

 
Romano ("Roman"), a reenactor, Lugo, Galicia

Adjective edit

romano (feminine romana, masculine plural romanos, feminine plural romanas)

  1. Roman

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

romano m (plural romanos, feminine romana, feminine plural romanas)

  1. Roman

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin rōmānus. By surface analysis, Roma (Rome) +‎ -ano (of or pertaining to).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /roˈma.no/
  • Rhymes: -ano
  • Hyphenation: ro‧mà‧no

Adjective edit

romano (feminine romana, masculine plural romani, feminine plural romane)

  1. Roman
  2. Roman Catholic

Noun edit

romano m (plural romani, feminine romana)

  1. Roman
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Arabic رُمَّان (rummān, pomegranate).

Noun edit

romano m (plural romani)

  1. weight of a steelyard balance

Anagrams edit

Kalo Finnish Romani edit

Etymology edit

From Romani rromano.

Noun edit

romano m

  1. Romani, Gypsy

References edit

  • romano” in Finnish Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

rōmānō

  1. dative/ablative masculine/neuter singular of rōmānus

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin rōmānus (Roman), from Rōma (Rome), corresponding to Roma +‎ -ano. Doublet of romão and romeno.

Pronunciation edit

 
 

  • Hyphenation: ro‧ma‧no

Adjective edit

romano (feminine romana, masculine plural romanos, feminine plural romanas)

  1. Roman (of or relating to the city of Rome)
  2. (historical) Roman (of or relating to the Ancient Roman civilisation)
  3. (religion) Roman (relating to the Roman Catholic Church)
    Synonym: católico romano

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

romano m (plural romanos, feminine romana, feminine plural romanas)

  1. Roman (a person from the city of Rome)
  2. (historical) Roman (a citizen of ancient Rome)

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Romani edit

Adjective edit

romano (feminine romani, plural romane)

  1. Alternative form of rromano (Romani)

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin rōmānus. Cognate with English Roman. Doublet of rumano.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /roˈmano/ [roˈma.no]
  • Rhymes: -ano
  • Syllabification: ro‧ma‧no

Adjective edit

romano (feminine romana, masculine plural romanos, feminine plural romanas)

  1. Roman (from or native to the city or empire of Rome)
  2. Roman (pertaining to Rome or the Romans)

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

romano m (plural romanos, feminine romana, feminine plural romanas)

  1. a Roman

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Welsh Romani edit

Etymology edit

From Romani rromano.

Adjective edit

romano m (feminine singular romani, masculine plural romane, comparative romaneder)

  1. gypsy
  2. gypsy-like, congenial, appealing to Gypsy taste
  3. old-fashioned, rustic, picturesque

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • romane” in Welsh Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • romani” in Welsh Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • romano” in Welsh Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.