See also: Romance, românce, and romancé

English edit

 
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Etymology edit

From Middle English romauns, roumance, borrowed from Anglo-Norman and Old French romanz, romans (the vernacular language of France, as opposed to Latin), from Medieval Latin rōmānicē, Vulgar Latin rōmānicē (in the Roman language, adverb), from Latin rōmānicus (roman, adj) from rōmānus (a Roman). Doublet of Romansch.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

romance (countable and uncountable, plural romances)

  1. A story relating to chivalry; a story involving knights, heroes, adventures, quests, etc.
  2. A tale of high adventure.
    • 1887, Harriet W. Daly, Digging, Squatting, and Pioneering Life in the Northern Territory of South Australia, page 152:
      Could one have known the past histories of some of the oddly-selected couples who shared everything in common, many a romance might have been written during what, to all outward appearances, was a dull and prosaic time to most lookers-on!
  3. An intimate relationship between two people; a love affair.
  4. A strong obsession or attachment for something or someone.
  5. Idealized love which is pure or beautiful.
  6. A mysterious, exciting, or fascinating quality.
  7. A story or novel dealing with idealized love.
  8. An embellished account of something; an idealized lie.
  9. An adventure, or series of extraordinary events, resembling those narrated in romances.
    His life was a romance.
  10. A dreamy, imaginative habit of mind; a disposition to ignore what is real.
    She was so full of romance she would forget what she was supposed to be doing.
  11. (music) A romanza, or sentimental ballad.

Quotations edit

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Japanese: ロマンス
  • Korean: 로맨스 (romaenseu)

Translations edit

Verb edit

romance (third-person singular simple present romances, present participle romancing, simple past and past participle romanced)

  1. (transitive) To woo; to court.
    • 2015 November 15, Meghan Blythe Adams, “Renegade Sex: Compulsory Sexuality and Charmed Magic Circles in the Mass Effect series”, in Loading… The Journal of the Canadian Game Studies Association[1], volume 9, number 14, →OCLC, archived from the original on 05 May 2018, page 47:
      A female Shepard can romance bisexual Yeoman Kelly Chambers, but doing so does not yield a Paramour achievement or an implied sex scene the way that romancing ‘official’ interests does. Similarly, the player can attempt to romance the Asari Samara or her Ardat-Yakshi daughter Morinth, but the former will refuse and sex with the latter will kill Shepard.
    • 2021 February 5, Nicholas Barber, “The Great Dictator: The film that dared to laugh at Hitler”, in BBC[2]:
      In the ghetto, the gentle Barber romances a defiant washerwoman, Hannah, who is played by Chaplin's wife at the time, Paulette Goddard.
  2. (intransitive) To write or tell romantic stories, poetry, letters, etc.
  3. (intransitive) To talk extravagantly and imaginatively; to build castles in the air.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French romance.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

romance f (plural romances or romancen)

  1. (literature, music, historical) An emotional popular-historical epic ballad. [from late 18th c.]
  2. (literature, music) A sentimental love song or love story.

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish romance, itself probably a borrowing from either Old French romanz or Old Occitan romans, meaning a narrative work in the vernacular speech, from Vulgar Latin *romanĭce (in a Roman manner), compare Medieval Latin rōmānice, ultimately from Latin rōmānicus. See also roman (novel).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

romance f (plural romances)

  1. a ballad; a love song

Descendants edit

Verb edit

romance

  1. inflection of romancer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading edit

Interlingua edit

Noun edit

romance (plural romances)

  1. novel

Adjective edit

romance (comparative plus romance, superlative le plus romance)

  1. Romance

Italian edit

Adjective edit

romance

  1. feminine plural of romancio

Anagrams edit

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Old Occitan romans, from Medieval Latin, Vulgar Latin rōmānicē (in a Roman manner), from Latin rōmānicus (Roman, adjective), from rōmānus (Roman, noun), from Rōma (Rome).

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: ro‧man‧ce

Noun edit

romance m (plural romances)

  1. (literature) novel (work of prose fiction)
  2. romance; love affair
    Synonym: caso

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Adjective edit

romance m or f (plural romances, not comparable)

  1. (linguistics) Romance (of the languages derived from Latin)
    Synonyms: neolatim, romanço, românico

Derived terms edit

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /roˈmanθe/ [roˈmãn̟.θe]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /roˈmanse/ [roˈmãn.se]
  • (Spain) Rhymes: -anθe
  • (Latin America) Rhymes: -anse
  • Syllabification: ro‧man‧ce

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Old Occitan romans, or Old French romanz, from Vulgar Latin *romanĭce, compare Medieval Latin rōmānice, ultimately from Latin rōmānicus < rōmānus. Cognates include Old French romanz, whence the modern French noun roman (novel).[1]

Adjective edit

romance m or f (masculine and feminine plural romances)

  1. Romance
    Synonym: románico
Derived terms edit

Noun edit

romance m (plural romances)

  1. romance, love affair
  2. romance (genre)
  3. novel
    Synonym: novela
Hyponyms edit
Descendants edit
  • French: romance (see there for further descendants)

Noun edit

romance m (uncountable)

  1. Spanish (language)
    Synonyms: castellano, español
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

romance

  1. inflection of romanzar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

References edit

  1. ^ Dauzat, Albert; Jean Dubois, Henri Mitterand (1964), “romance”, in Nouveau dictionnaire étymologique (in French), Paris: Librairie Larousse

Further reading edit