See also: sända and Sanda

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Mandarin 散打 (sǎndǎ).

NounEdit

sanda (uncountable)

  1. A Chinese martial art and sport, similar to kick-boxing.
    • 1995, C. Blijd, E. Blijd, & W. Pieter, “Wushu Injuries: A Pilot Study”, in Biology of Sport, volume 12, number 3, page 163:
      The major injury situation for the sanda males was attacking with a punch (66.7%) followed by attacking with a kick (33.3%).
    • 2009, Brian Preston, Me, Chi, and Bruce Lee, →ISBN:
      Sanda is a sport art, basically kick-boxing with throws. It's generally about scoring points, there are few knock-outs.
    • 2011, Su Jianjiao, “Research on Leg-Applied Technology in Man's Sanda Competition in the 11th National Games of PRC”, in Advances in Education and Management, →ISBN:
      Using methods of literature material, video observation and mathematical statistics, this paper analyzed sanda players' leg-applied technology.
    • 2011, Yan Liu, Kung Fu Engineering, →ISBN:
      Some of the Sanda skills were taken from external kung fu and were used in real fight.

Etymology 2Edit

From Hindi सांडा (sāṇḍā).

NounEdit

sanda (plural sandas)

  1. A desert reptile, Saara hardwickii, a type of spiny-tailed lizard.
    • 1893, North Indian Notes and Queries - Volume 3, page 99:
      The sanda is easily caught by a horse-hair noose placed over the opening of his burrow, which is always of uniform shape, and the exact size of what would be a mid-section of the reptile. The sanda is in great repute as a resotorative and aphrodisiac, and even high caste Hindus, such as Brahmans and Rajpats, boil them down into a strong soup.
    • 1913, Journal of the Gypsy Lore Society, page 122:
      Bhantus catch the sanda, or broad-tailed lizard, which dwells in rat-holes in the ground and lives always in fear of the cobra, in the following manner: — The Sansi sallies forth with a wooden mallet in one hand and a tuft of tough grass in the other. On his belly he wriggles up to the sanda's hole, rustling the tuft of grass with a noise which resembles the crackling of a snake's scales. The sanda comes up tail foremost, and blocks the orifice with his pachydermatous appendage. The Sansi then delivers a crushing blow with the mallet on the earth an inch or two on the inside of the sanda, closes the passage, cuts off retreat, extracts the lizard and stuffs it into his shirt.
    • 1997, Valmik Thapar, Land of the Tiger: A Natural History of the Indian Subcontinent, →ISBN:
      A favourite prey species is the sanda or spiny-tailed lizard.

Etymology 3Edit

Ultimately from Sanskrit षण्ढ (ṣaṇḍha, eunuch, hermaphrodite), which is often conflated with साण्ड (sāṇḍa, bull) in New Indo-Aryan languages due to sound change.

NounEdit

sanda (plural sandas)

  1. (India) A man who is congenitally impotent.
    • 1992, Jos Ignacio Cabez, Buddhism, Sexuality, and Gender, →ISBN, page 211:
      Vasubandhu at (II.1c) (and elsewhere in the Abhidharmakosa, see Note 13) draws a distinction between the sanda and the pandaka, which Yasomitra understands in the following way: pandakas are those individuals who have lost their indriya, that is, the masculinity or femininity principle, through some means (upakrama), whereas sanda is taken to apply to category 1, the congenitally impotent.
    • 1994, Suśruta, Suśruta-saṃhitā: Śārīrasthānam, page 37:
      But when this normal posture is reverse and a male partner lies below down in supine position and female partner lies upon him in prone posture while doing intercourse, they will develop a "sanda-child".
    • 2000, Julia Leslie & Mary McGee, Invented Identities: The Interplay of Gender, Religion and Politics in India:
      Furthermore, according to Abhidharmakosa 6.23b, when one attains certain higher stages of the path, one will never again be reborn as a sanda, pandaka or hermaphrodite.
    • 2012, John Powers, A Bull of a Man, →ISBN, page 82:
      Vasubandhu, for example, states that sexual deviants, along with eunuchs (sanda) and hermaphrodites, “possess, to an extreme degree, the defilements of the senses.

Etymology 4Edit

From Swahili sanda.

NounEdit

sanda (plural sandas)

  1. A white calico shroud used in East Africa.
    • 1963, Joseph Mawinza, The Human Soul: Life and Soul-concept in an East African Mentality, page 86:
      This washing is done by several elderly persons of the respective sex and these wrap it up with a sanda (white calico), either one or several according to the dignity, age and richness of the dead. But sanda instead of mikuswa (banana-leaves) was introduced lately because the people were not using clothes but mayombwe, i.e. stringy material (56a). The sanda comes next to the body whilst the mat will be spread inside the grave and another covers the outer of the mutufwi (57).
    • 1967, Alfons Loogman, Duquesne Studies: African series - Volume 2, page 129:
      The cloth, guo, which had been removed from the corpse and replaced by the sanda, is now spread over the grave so that the bystanders do not see the deposition of the body in its final resting place, the mwana-wa-ndani, explained in the next note.
    • 1982, P. Van Pelt, Bantu Customs in Mainland Tanzania, page 230:
      Before the sanda is sewn up, men of the neighbourhood dig the grave. While they are busy, the sanda is closed.
    • 2012, Ian D. Dicks, An African Worldview: The Muslim Amacinga Yawo of Southern Malaŵi, →ISBN:
      Yawo Muslims do not use wooden coffins, but bury their dead by wrapping them in a calico sheet called sanda.

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

sanda (plural sandas)

  1. Alternative form of sandarac
    • 1860, New York State Agricultural Society, Proceedings of the Annual Meeting, page 464:
      Many of these trees yield rosin and gums, as I practically know, and they are worthy of being examined. As for example a sanda, which produces seche de sanda ; this is a valuable remedy for quickly healing cuts and other wounds.
    • 2007, Charles Harvey, Ndoki, →ISBN, page 13:
      The giant mango trees were almost as old as the sanda and have produced fruit for a century.

Etymology 6Edit

From Malay sanda.

NounEdit

sanda (uncountable)

  1. (Malaysia) A traditional music style.
    • 2001, Review of Indonesian and Malaysian Affairs:
      Sanda is a venerated, solemn genre; in this area of east Manggarai rima it occurs only on the occasion of a religious festival such as penti.
    • 2015, Dawei Zheng, Control, Mechatronics and Automation Technology, →ISBN:
      The second part of recomposed Embroidering Golden Banner achieves the brightness and cheerfulness of music, and presents a cheerful passion through sanda playing methods such as left-hind octave fills, right-hand echo decoration, and encircled decoration.

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

sanda

  1. third-person singular present indicative of sandar
  2. second-person singular imperative of sandar

HausaEdit

NounEdit

sànda m or f (plural sandunā̀, possessed form sàndan)

  1. stick, baton, staff, pole
  2. unit used to measure cloth (about 1 meter)

Derived termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

sanda

  1. indefinite accusative plural of sandur
  2. indefinite genitive plural of sandur

InonhanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *si-ida, from Proto-Austronesian *si-da.

PronounEdit

sanda

  1. they

RatagnonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *si-ida, from Proto-Austronesian *si-da.

PronounEdit

sanda

  1. they

SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

From Mandarin 散打 (sǎndǎ).

NounEdit

sanda m or f (uncountable)

  1. sanda (Chinese kickboxing)

HypernymsEdit


SwahiliEdit

NounEdit

sanda (n class, plural sanda)

  1. sanda (white calico shroud)

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

sand +‎ -a

VerbEdit

sanda (present sandar, preterite sandade, supine sandat, imperative sanda)

  1. to distribute sand over an icy or snowy surface, in particular to make it less slippery

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Tok PisinEdit

NounEdit

sanda

  1. perfume

See alsoEdit