sax

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PIE root
*sek-

From Middle English sax, sex, from Old English seax ‎(a knife, hip-knife, an instrument for cutting, a short sword, dirk, dagger), from Proto-Germanic *sahsą ‎(rock, knife), from Proto-Indo-European *sek- ‎(to cut). Cognate with North Frisian sax ‎(knife, sword), Middle Dutch sas ‎(knife), Middle Low German sax ‎(knife), Middle High German sahs ‎(a knife), Danish saks ‎(a pair of scissors), Swedish sax ‎(a pair of scissors), Icelandic sax ‎(a short heavy sword), Latin secō ‎(cut). See also Saxon, saw.

NounEdit

sax ‎(plural saxes)

  1. (rare or obsolete) A knife; a sword; a dagger about 20 inches in length.
  2. A slate-cutter's hammer; slate-ax.
Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

sax ‎(third-person singular simple present saxes, present participle saxing, simple past and past participle saxed)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To cut or slash with a sharp instrument; incise; scarify.

Etymology 2Edit

From saxophone. Distantly related to etymology one, as Adolphe Sax's surname is cognate to etymology one.

NounEdit

sax ‎(plural saxes)

  1. Short form of saxophone.

AnagramsEdit


AleutEdit

NounEdit

sax

  1. bird skin coat

KurdishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sax (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

  1. alive
  2. healthy
  3. whole

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

sax

  1. rafsi of sarxe.

ScotsEdit

NumeralEdit

sax

  1. (cardinal) six

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sǫx (plural of sax), from Proto-Germanic *sahsą, from Proto-Indo-European *sek-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sax c

  1. a pair of scissors; shears
  2. short of saxofon
  3. a trap for animals

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of sax
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sax saxen saxar saxarna
Genitive sax saxens saxars saxarnas

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

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